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NASA confirms mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 21st 19, 05:38 PM posted to sci.space.policy
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Posts: 651
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, will indeed
happen. The mission was initially explored starting in 2017, with the space agency
looking for reports on how it might proceed, and now NASA has said it will go
ahead and move to the key step of finalizing mission design, which will then lead
to actually building the spacecraft that will make the trip, and the science
payload it’ll carry on board.

The goal of the mission, which is codenamed “Europa Clipper,” is to find out
whether the icy natural satellite orbiting Jupiter could sustain life, and also
explore whether it might be colonizable or habitable. Plus, we’ll definitely learn
a lot more about Europa with an up-close-and-personal exploration."

See:

https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/20/na...ts-icy-oceans/
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  #2  
Old August 21st 19, 09:08 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Scott Kozel
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Posts: 26
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 12:38:02 PM UTC-4, wrote:
"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, will indeed
happen. The mission was initially explored starting in 2017, with the space agency
looking for reports on how it might proceed, and now NASA has said it will go
ahead and move to the key step of finalizing mission design, which will then lead
to actually building the spacecraft that will make the trip, and the science
payload it’ll carry on board.

The goal of the mission, which is codenamed “Europa Clipper,” is to find out
whether the icy natural satellite orbiting Jupiter could sustain life, and also
explore whether it might be colonizable or habitable. Plus, we’ll definitely learn
a lot more about Europa with an up-close-and-personal exploration."

See:

https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/20/na...ts-icy-oceans/


Says nothing about landing or drilling.

"NASA’s goal for this mission is to launch as early as 2023, though it’ll need its SLS launch system to be ready to make that happen. The extended timeline allows for a launch-ready state by 2025, which seems a bit more realistic given the current state of affairs."

So a rocket in the Saturn V size class is needed for this mission?
  #3  
Old August 22nd 19, 01:13 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
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Posts: 1,976
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter?s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

In article ,
says...

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 12:38:02 PM UTC-4, wrote:
"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter, will indeed
happen. The mission was initially explored starting in 2017, with the space agency
looking for reports on how it might proceed, and now NASA has said it will go
ahead and move to the key step of finalizing mission design, which will then lead
to actually building the spacecraft that will make the trip, and the science
payload it?ll carry on board.

The goal of the mission, which is codenamed ?Europa Clipper,? is to find out
whether the icy natural satellite orbiting Jupiter could sustain life, and also
explore whether it might be colonizable or habitable. Plus, we?ll definitely learn
a lot more about Europa with an up-close-and-personal exploration."

See:

https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/20/na...ts-icy-oceans/

Says nothing about landing or drilling.

"NASA?s goal for this mission is to launch as early as 2023, though it?ll need its SLS launch system to be ready to make that happen. The extended timeline allows for a launch-ready state by 2025, which seems a bit more realistic given the current state of affairs."

So a rocket in the Saturn V size class is needed for this mission?


A Falcon Heavy with an added solid kick stage could do the job, but it
would take longer to get there and require flybys. A Delta IV Heavy
with a solid kick stage could do it as well, but I'm not sure ULA could
produce anymore Delta IV Heavies.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #4  
Old August 22nd 19, 07:22 AM posted to sci.space.policy
[email protected]
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Posts: 651
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 1:09:00 PM UTC-7, Scott Kozel wrote:


Says nothing about landing or drilling.

"NASA’s goal for this mission is to launch as early as 2023, though it’ll need its SLS launch system to be ready to make that happen.. The extended timeline allows for a launch-ready state by 2025, which seems a bit more realistic given the current state of affairs."

So a rocket in the Saturn V size class is needed for this mission?


According to:

https://www.extremetech.com/extreme/...lipper-mission


"While Europa Clipper won’t land on the surface, it will make more than 40 close
flybys of the moon, probing it with a suite of nine instruments to analyze the
planet’s magnetic field, temperature, and more. Europa occasionally ejects
plumes of water vapor into space, and Europa Clipper could analyze the chemical
composition of the water if it manages to fly through one."

  #5  
Old August 23rd 19, 03:51 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 662
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter?s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

"Jeff Findley" wrote in message
...

In article ,
says...

On Wednesday, August 21, 2019 at 12:38:02 PM UTC-4,
wrote:
"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter,
will indeed
happen. The mission was initially explored starting in 2017, with the
space agency
looking for reports on how it might proceed, and now NASA has said it
will go
ahead and move to the key step of finalizing mission design, which will
then lead
to actually building the spacecraft that will make the trip, and the
science
payload it?ll carry on board.

The goal of the mission, which is codenamed ?Europa Clipper,? is to
find out
whether the icy natural satellite orbiting Jupiter could sustain life,
and also
explore whether it might be colonizable or habitable. Plus, we?ll
definitely learn
a lot more about Europa with an up-close-and-personal exploration."

See:

https://techcrunch.com/2019/08/20/na...ts-icy-oceans/


Says nothing about landing or drilling.

"NASA?s goal for this mission is to launch as early as 2023, though it?ll
need its SLS launch system to be ready to make that happen. The extended
timeline allows for a launch-ready state by 2025, which seems a bit more
realistic given the current state of affairs."

So a rocket in the Saturn V size class is needed for this mission?


A Falcon Heavy with an added solid kick stage could do the job, but it
would take longer to get there and require flybys. A Delta IV Heavy
with a solid kick stage could do it as well, but I'm not sure ULA could
produce anymore Delta IV Heavies.


Or wait until SpaceX/NASA perfects in-space refueling and refuel a Falcon 9
upper stage or two.
Sure it'll take time and development, but I'd bet would still be cheaper and
faster than SLS!



Jeff


--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
IT Disaster Response -
https://www.amazon.com/Disaster-Resp...dp/1484221834/

  #6  
Old August 23rd 19, 12:15 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,976
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter?s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

In article ,
says...
A Falcon Heavy with an added solid kick stage could do the job, but it
would take longer to get there and require flybys. A Delta IV Heavy
with a solid kick stage could do it as well, but I'm not sure ULA could
produce anymore Delta IV Heavies.


Or wait until SpaceX/NASA perfects in-space refueling and refuel a Falcon 9
upper stage or two.
Sure it'll take time and development, but I'd bet would still be cheaper and
faster than SLS!


That'd certainly do it. Then you wouldn't even need a Falcon Heavy for
this mission, since the payload is so light to begin with. Just several
Falcon 9 propellant flights to refill the upper stage(es) with the
payload on top. And in the end it would still cost a lot less than an
SLS flight.

I wouldn't bet on that happening though, since SpaceX is interested in
refueling for Starship, not Falcon. And Congress wouldn't fund this
until SLS is dead and buried, which I don't anticipate happening anytime
soon. IMHO, as long as Shelby is still Senator, SLS will be funded.

Here is a great article on the politics of on-orbit refueling, in case
you missed it (sorry about the word wrap).

The SLS rocket may have curbed development of on-orbit refueling for a
decade "Boeing became furious and tried to get me fired."
ERIC BERGER - 8/1/2019, 10:42 AM
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...ist-says-that-
boeing-squelched-work-on-propellant-depots/

Note the quotes from the Tweets of George Sowers. I saw those Tweets in
real time and I knew there would be an Ars Technica article on them the
next day. No way would George Sowers have ever said anything like that
publicly when he was working for ULA when he "was leading the advanced
programs group at United Launch Alliance".

The above is the reason that in orbit refueling has been an uphill
battle to get funded. It also explains why ULA talked about reusable
ACES upper stages, but never actually explained how you'd refuel them.

Jeff

--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #7  
Old August 23rd 19, 04:10 PM posted to sci.space.policy
[email protected]
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Posts: 651
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter?s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

On Friday, August 23, 2019 at 4:15:21 AM UTC-7, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article ,
says...
A Falcon Heavy with an added solid kick stage could do the job, but it
would take longer to get there and require flybys. A Delta IV Heavy
with a solid kick stage could do it as well, but I'm not sure ULA could
produce anymore Delta IV Heavies.


Or wait until SpaceX/NASA perfects in-space refueling and refuel a Falcon 9
upper stage or two.
Sure it'll take time and development, but I'd bet would still be cheaper and
faster than SLS!


That'd certainly do it. Then you wouldn't even need a Falcon Heavy for
this mission, since the payload is so light to begin with. Just several
Falcon 9 propellant flights to refill the upper stage(es) with the
payload on top. And in the end it would still cost a lot less than an
SLS flight.

I wouldn't bet on that happening though, since SpaceX is interested in
refueling for Starship, not Falcon. And Congress wouldn't fund this
until SLS is dead and buried, which I don't anticipate happening anytime
soon. IMHO, as long as Shelby is still Senator, SLS will be funded.

Here is a great article on the politics of on-orbit refueling, in case
you missed it (sorry about the word wrap).

The SLS rocket may have curbed development of on-orbit refueling for a
decade "Boeing became furious and tried to get me fired."
ERIC BERGER - 8/1/2019, 10:42 AM
https://arstechnica.com/science/2019...ist-says-that-
boeing-squelched-work-on-propellant-depots/

Note the quotes from the Tweets of George Sowers. I saw those Tweets in
real time and I knew there would be an Ars Technica article on them the
next day. No way would George Sowers have ever said anything like that
publicly when he was working for ULA when he "was leading the advanced
programs group at United Launch Alliance".

The above is the reason that in orbit refueling has been an uphill
battle to get funded. It also explains why ULA talked about reusable
ACES upper stages, but never actually explained how you'd refuel them.

Jeff

--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.




Too bad, orbital refueling looks promising:

"A startup company that plans to develop tankers for refueling satellites has
completed a key test of its technology on the International Space Station.

Orbit Fab announced June 18 it completed tests of an experiment called Furphy on
the ISS, demonstrating the ability to transfer water between two satellite
testbeds. At the end of the tests, the water was transferred into the station’s
own water supply, the first time a private payload supplied the station with
water in that manner.

“The Furphy mission has allowed us to test the viability of refueling satellites
in orbit,” Jeremy Schiel, cofounder and chief marketing officer of Orbit Fab,
said in a statement. The tests, he said, were intended to measure the
effectiveness of the company’s propellant transfer technology in microgravity
and its ability to handle issues like sloshing."

See:

https://spacenews.com/orbit-fab-demo...nology-on-iss/
  #8  
Old August 23rd 19, 11:39 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Greg \(Strider\) Moore
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Posts: 662
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter’s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

"JF Mezei" wrote in message ...

On 2019-08-21 12:38, wrote:
"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter,



The actual NASA press releas at:
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/europa-...moon-confirmed

says nothing about launch vehicle.

Question:

Would launching on SLS vs Falcon vs Delta IV result in significantly
different structure in the spacecraft itself to widthsnad different
launch environments (G force, vibration) or would those basically be
equivalent and they focus only on mass?

And from a budget point of view, would "Planetary Missions Programm
Office" be able to "steal" an SLS from the Artemis programm office or
would that be really diffidult now that Artemis is on a high level of PR
and they woudln.t want to announce any cutback to program with the
limited numebr of SLS launches they have?

Could Europa Clipper launch on oe of the unmanned SLS test launches
(thus not cutting into Artemis's plans) ?



Europa Clipper was manifested awhile ago for SLS-3.

--
Greg D. Moore http://greenmountainsoftware.wordpress.com/
CEO QuiCR: Quick, Crowdsourced Responses. http://www.quicr.net
IT Disaster Response -
https://www.amazon.com/Disaster-Resp...dp/1484221834/

  #9  
Old August 24th 19, 01:27 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,976
Default NASA confirms mission to Jupiter?s moon Europa to explore its icy oceans

In article ,
says...

On 2019-08-21 12:38,
wrote:
"NASA has confirmed a mission to Europa, one of the moons of Jupiter,



The actual NASA press releas at:
https://www.nasa.gov/feature/europa-...moon-confirmed

says nothing about launch vehicle.

Question:

Would launching on SLS vs Falcon vs Delta IV result in significantly
different structure in the spacecraft itself to widthsnad different
launch environments (G force, vibration) or would those basically be
equivalent and they focus only on mass?


They'll likely design the structure to be launched on any of the
vehicles which could be available.

The bigger problem is thermals. If you launch on a vehicle that
requires a Venus flyby, the spacecraft has to be able to handle the
thermal environment of the inner solar system as well as the outer solar
system. That's a challenge. But it's also a challenge that other outer
planet missions have had.

And from a budget point of view, would "Planetary Missions Programm
Office" be able to "steal" an SLS from the Artemis programm office or
would that be really diffidult now that Artemis is on a high level of PR
and they woudln.t want to announce any cutback to program with the
limited numebr of SLS launches they have?


There would be no stealing. Congress would either fund it, or it would
not. Best to not bet on having an SLS and design the thing to be
capable of being launched on more than one launch vehicle.

Could Europa Clipper launch on oe of the unmanned SLS test launches
(thus not cutting into Artemis's plans) ?


Nope. First SLS flight is uncrewed Orion. Second SLS flight is crewed
Orion. So exactly one uncrewed test flight for SLS before it's declared
"operational". That's a hell of a lot less than NASA required of the
SpaceX Falcon 9 Block 5, which I believe was seven successful launches
in the same configuration to be used for commercial crew.

Jeff

--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
 




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