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Gravity wave Detectors ???



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 2nd 07, 03:04 PM posted to alt.astronomy
G=EMC^2 Glazier[_1_]
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Posts: 10,860
Default Gravity wave Detectors ???

I won't be around to hear people say I was right. sad but true The year
is now 2018 and LISA is in space trying to detect gravity waves,and as
I predicted here did not detect any. We are still going with the rubber
sheet (two dimensional thinking at best) We still have the crazy
analogy of space waves like waves on a pond. Reality is even when a
giant supernova explodes,and they supposedly give off great gravity
waves we will never detect them. The only way gravity can be
detected would be if a black hole came into existence instantly at a
distance from here to the moon. That is impossible. To detect gravity
waves is just as impossible. Reason is it has no detectable wave. It
has no field. It is a negative energy force. It relates only to
accelerating motion. To study inertia is to study gravity. That is
what Einstein and I talked about. bert

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  #2  
Old August 2nd 07, 03:53 PM posted to alt.astronomy
oldcoot
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Default Gravity wave Detectors ???


Bert, you're not 'getting' the clear-cut distinction between gravity
and 'gravitational waves'.. the latter being more correctly defined as
*spatial acoustic pressure waves*. But don't feel bad, few in the
acedemic mainstream 'get' it either. oc


  #3  
Old August 3rd 07, 02:41 AM posted to alt.astronomy
BradGuth
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Default Gravity wave Detectors ???

On Aug 2, 7:53 am, oldcoot wrote:
Bert, you're not 'getting' the clear-cut distinction between gravity
and 'gravitational waves'.. the latter being more correctly defined as
*spatial acoustic pressure waves*. But don't feel bad, few in the
acedemic mainstream 'get' it either. oc


Anything that's in motion is causing a distortion in gravity. What if
anything in this universe is not in motion?

Isn't everything going every which way but lose?

An item such as our nearby and big old salty moon that's going around
our flat Earth is causing a great deal of gravity wave distortion, so
much so that some folks actually think Earth is a passive sphere.

Get it?

Passive gravity causes all things to become round in all directions,
whereas gravity distortions cause things to become somwhat less than
round in all directions. Being less than exactly round in all
directions is not exactly a good sign for the long haul.

What if an atom whasn't exactly round in all directions?
- Brad Guth

 




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