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Interview John Bilcow on the Work to a Next Generation Space Station



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 29th 19, 12:39 AM posted to sci.space.policy
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Default Interview John Bilcow on the Work to a Next Generation Space Station

Would this thing actually be worth the huge amount on money needed to build it?


"Gateway Foundation has plans to build a circular space station that can hold 400
people. This will be called the Von Braun station. It will have twenty-four
modules that are each 12 meters in diameter by 20 meters in length. There will be
a ferris wheel like frame and a center hub and elevators. Each module will have
about 8000 cubic meters in volume. There will be connecting docking areas for 24
Dream Chasers as lifeboats to enable full evacuation of the structure. The entire
Von Bruan structure will have about 300,000 cubic meters of volume. This will be
about 300 times more than the International Space Station.

The Von Braun will have the volume of a large cruise ship."

See:

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/0...e-station.html
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  #2  
Old August 29th 19, 02:22 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Scott Kozel
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Default Interview John Bilcow on the Work to a Next Generation Space Station

On Wednesday, August 28, 2019 at 7:39:19 PM UTC-4, wrote:
Would this thing actually be worth the huge amount on money needed to build it?


"Gateway Foundation has plans to build a circular space station that can hold 400
people. This will be called the Von Braun station. It will have twenty-four
modules that are each 12 meters in diameter by 20 meters in length. There will be
a ferris wheel like frame and a center hub and elevators. Each module will have
about 8000 cubic meters in volume. There will be connecting docking areas for 24
Dream Chasers as lifeboats to enable full evacuation of the structure. The entire
Von Bruan structure will have about 300,000 cubic meters of volume. This will be
about 300 times more than the International Space Station.

The Von Braun will have the volume of a large cruise ship."

See:

https://www.nextbigfuture.com/2019/0...e-station.html


How about the cost of transporting 400 people to the station, and to keep
it staffed by periodic return trips and new personnel?
  #4  
Old August 31st 19, 03:07 PM posted to sci.space.policy
David Spain
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Default Interview John Bilcow on the Work to a Next Generation SpaceStation

On 2019-08-30 8:57 PM, wrote:
On Thursday, August 29, 2019 at 9:12:20 AM UTC-4, David Spain wrote:
Look I'm not trying to be a Debbie Downer here. Just trying to figure
how you get from Point A to Point B. I love the idea of VBS and the
follow-on Spaceport. I just don't see what economics drive it unless you
have something else really big going on in space. Like a big mining
operation, or a powersat operation, a lunar base or something else.... A
station like this won't exist just because you can build it. This is not
build it and they will come. In 2019, space is still a highly 'vertical'
business if you pardon the pun. Maybe in 2119 things will be different?
Personally I'm hoping VBS or something similar happens by *no later than
2060*, perhaps as early as 2030-2040, but I'm an optimist. But in 2019?
I don't see it as viable.

Dave


Atom computers built in low g opens the world of ultrafast
computation. good for encryption cracking and physics computation.

The world of molecular theory for use in cancer therapy
also benefits.

Sure I can see some of that. When the heavy lithography equipment can be
moved into space economically. Problem is that kind of gear also needs
incredible stability. I've seen these machines and know that for even
those that only worked in the sub-micron dimensions (let alone 40nm or
less these days) they were mounted on pedestals that were separate from
the building foundations they were housed in and went all the way down
to bedrock to anchor them from even the minutest vibration that would
destroy the lithography. How does that map to a rotating space station?
I suspect novel manufacturing techniques are needed to do space
electronics that largely don't exist today. So maybe in 50-60 years? Or
I'm an optimist so maybe 30 years?

Molecular biology has a better chance of getting into space quickly.
There has been a lot of work done on this and on process at the ISS
already. I'd put that on a faster track. Maybe 20-30 years out for a
major pharma mfg. site. But a dedicated lab could be built into a
Starship to do that just as well and bring the product back down to
Earth for sale with no added infrastructure. Since Starships will exist
before a VBS, again I ask, how to I get from A-B?

Dave

  #5  
Old September 1st 19, 08:10 PM posted to sci.space.policy
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Default Interview John Bilcow on the Work to a Next Generation Space Station

On Saturday, August 31, 2019 at 9:58:58 AM UTC-4, Jeff Findley wrote:
In article ,
says...

Atom computers built in low g opens the world of ultrafast
computation. good for encryption cracking and physics computation.


In theory.

The world of molecular theory for use in cancer therapy
also benefits.


In theory.

Now, I'm not saying microgravity research is bad, because it's clearly a
"good thing". But your statements read like the ones from the 1950s
that said everything would be run by nuclear power by the end of the
20th century. You can open up a Popular Mechanics magazine from the 50s
and there are cutaway drawings of watches with "atomic batteries". That
clearly didn't happen.

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.


Atom computers use single atoms as the signal. IBM
has successfully built an atom shuffling array of
atoms on a cold copper plate. Constructing a computer
algorithm as its own array is a topic I can't debate.

Regardless, the capacity to move single atoms at a time
and forming arrays is speculative as concerns orbital construction's
benefits.
 




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