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Some DPS Meeting discoveries: Comparative Exo-planetology, Metalstar/metal planet, interacting planets, new KBO Planet possible, Spitzeropportunities, Enceladus water cycle, Jupiter lightning, Mercury's Sodium tail& CEV missions to NEO's



 
 
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Old November 16th 07, 05:37 PM posted to sci.astro, sci.astro.amateur
Jason H.[_2_]
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Default Some DPS Meeting discoveries: Comparative Exo-planetology, Metalstar/metal planet, interacting planets, new KBO Planet possible, Spitzeropportunities, Enceladus water cycle, Jupiter lightning, Mercury's Sodium tail& CEV missions to NEO's

I just wanted to add that some of the discoveries made by Astronomers
and announced at that conference (abstracts of which can be found in
the Bulletin of the American Astronomical Society) included:

Astronomers announced that soon will there will be released the
results of thermal measurements by Spitzer of the atmospheres of
around 10 exoplanets and that the age of comparative planetology has
arrived.

An astronomer inferred from observations of transiting explanets that
there is a correlation between high-metalicity stars and their being
orbited by metal-rich planets.

Astronomers presented evidence that 2 planets around HD155358 are
"dynamically interacting with each other."

Astronomers from Japan predict through simulations of the Kuiper belt
shape that a planet several tenths of an Earth mass could be orbiting
beyond Pluto.

Attendees were made aware of a Spitzer Target of Opportunity Program
which invites planet-hunters to participate.

The New Horizons spacecraft observed polar lightning on Jupiter

Astronomers predict from Enceladus plumes and tiger stripe shear that
internal temperatures are hot and that it has a full liquid water
cycle that could make it habitable.

Astronomers reported a surprisingly long sodium tail for Mercury

and

and there was one paper "Piloted Missions to Near-Earth Objects via
the Crew Exploration Vehicle".

There was a lot more than the above presented at the conference.
Abstracts from the Division of Planetary Sciences conference held in
Orlando in Oct. '07 can be found via the Bulletin of the American
Astronomical Society, Volume 39, No. 3.

Regards, Jason H.

http://setisociety.org

On Oct 9, 10:06 am, "Jason H." wrote:
The American Astronomical Society's 39th Division of Planetary
Sciences is Meeting being held this week at the Rosen Center in
Orlando FL


http://physics.ucf.edu/DPS07/


I luckily got to speak to Astronomers about a great many of the newest
discoveries and about the gear being used. One of the things I
learned (out of the many) was that amateur astronomers were helpful in
guiding the science that happened at the New Horizons Jupiter
encounter.


Below are some of the topics being discussed and published at the DPS
conference this week (you can find more detailed abstracts of
individual posters under each subject at the above website):


Giant planets: Winds and Lightning


Enceladus: Saturn's Fountain


Sulfur and Sodium, Io and Mercury


Giant Planets: Chemistry, Interior Structure, Aurorae, and
Magnetosphere


YORP Observed!


The Yin-Yang Body: Closest Look at Iapetus


Running Rings Around Saturn: Structure and Origin


What's Next with NEO Searches


Giant planets Atmospheric Dynamics


Rings Identity Crisis: Dust, Moonlets, and Propellers


Satellite Potpourri: From the Moon to Hyperion


Exoplanets Special Session: We Want YOU to Work on Exoplanets!


Of NEAs and PHAs


Altering Mars Physically and Chemically


New Horizons at Jupiter


Asteroids: Bits, Pieces, and Binaries


Of Martian Dust, Ice, and Wind


Jupiter: Atmosphere, Dynamics, and Chemistry


Asteroids: Surfaces and Weathering


Deep Impact


Planets Past Pluto


Moons of Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune


Mars: Atmosphere


Mercury and the Moon


Planetary Rings


Outreach and Education


NASA Outer Planets Flagship Mission Studies


Exoplanets: The Other 96%


Asteroids: Observations and Physical Properties


Martian Atmospheric Chemistry and Dynamics


Planet and Satellite Creation and Evolution


Asteroids: Spectra, metals, and minerals


Future Missions and Instruments


Asteroids: Observations and Physical Properties


Comet Nucleus: Where it All Begins


Saturn: Atmosphere and Magnetosphere


Ices in the Lab and in the Solar System


TNOs and Centaurs: Spin, Reflectance, and Composition


Mars: Surface and Interior


Saturn's Icy Moons


Comet Nucleus: Where it All Begins


Titan's Surface and Interior


Venus Chemistry


Exploring the Lunar Late Heavy Bombardment


Titan Atmosphere


Comet Comae: All Things Gaseous


Dwarf Planets, TNOs, and Centaurs: Ices in the Underworld


Asteroids: Discoveries and Dynamical Evolution


Asteroids: Discoveries and Dynamical Evolution


Pluto, TNOs and Centaurs: Binaries, Thermal Modeling, and Dynamics


Comet Comae: All Things Gaseous


Comet Dust, Activity, Fragmentation; Meteors and Meteroids


Giant Planet Atmospheres: Models, Neptune, and Uranus


Titan: Atmosphere (Chemistry, Clouds, and Dynamics)


Titan: Surface, Interior, Evolution


Venus


Comet Dust, Activity, Fragmentation; Meteors, Meteroids, and
Interplanetary Dust


Planet Migration


Venus Aeronomy, Clouds, Winds and Oceans


Pluto System


Titan Atmosphere with Spin


Kuiper Belt: Structure and Evolution


Regards, Jason H.

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