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National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden



 
 
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  #1  
Old July 7th 10, 04:53 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Pat Flannery
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Posts: 18,465
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

As if Michael Steele wasn't bad enough, now another black man is
cuddling up to the enemies of Israel:
http://corner.nationalreview.com/pos...Q1Nzc5NWYxMzE=
http://corner.nationalreview.com/pos...AwNmZmZmQzOTU=
http://corner.nationalreview.com/pos...ViZmUxZmY5NzU=

Pat
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  #2  
Old July 7th 10, 11:53 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Quadibloc
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Posts: 7,018
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

On Jul 6, 9:53*pm, Pat Flannery wrote:
As if Michael Steele wasn't bad enough, now another black man is
cuddling up to the enemies of Israel:


That, was, of course, intended in sarcasm.

But I do find the statement bizarre. NASA does have a legitimate role
to promote science education, not only in the United States, but also
elsewhere in the world, because the excitement associated with space
activities provides it with a unique qualification in that area. But
viewing it as a _major_ element of NASA's mission, and specifically
targeted at the Muslim world, is... odd.

There's nothing wrong in admitting that.

John Savard
  #3  
Old July 8th 10, 12:12 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Val Kraut
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Posts: 329
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden


"
But I do find the statement bizarre. NASA does have a legitimate role
to promote science education, not only in the United States, but also
elsewhere in the world, because the excitement associated with space
activities provides it with a unique qualification in that area.

Read the statement carefully - He is to make the muslim nations pround of
the math and science they did centuries ago - he's not there to promote
education in countries that don't value education anymore and actually
deprive women of any education. It' simply Dr. feelgood. What could they
possibly have in mind with this insanity.

Read on - he's to promote American students to study math and engineering -
but he's shutting down NASA and squeezing defense spending - I guess they're
after better educated unemployed.

This whole thing seems like episode 2 of the prisioner.


  #4  
Old July 8th 10, 02:56 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Brian Thorn[_2_]
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Posts: 2,266
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 20:28:12 -0800, Pat Flannery
wrote:

It's highly unlikely the ISS will ever repay even a small part of its
development, construction, and resupply costs in any sort of a tangible
economic way at any point in the future.


If the Salmonella vaccine pans out, it might already have.
Salmonellosis kills an estimated 3 million people a year, mostly in
the third world (142,000 were sickened in the US last year and 30
died).

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/0...a-vaccine.html

We have ten years or more of Space Station research ahead of us.
Reports of ISS's failure to earn its keep are greatly exaggerated.

Brian
  #5  
Old July 9th 10, 03:04 AM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Val Kraut
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Posts: 329
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden


Let's look at some basic history.

In the 1950s and 1960s we pushed science and engineering, lots of students
were graduated:

Then came the nuclear test ban treaty - and many high tech businesses
including electrical equipment houses bit the dust.

Then we cancelled Apollo, cancelled the supersonic transport etc and there
was mass uneployment on the technical fields. They even made a movie with
George Kennedy as a surplused engineer called An American Tragedy.

Then there were the students who got advanced degrees in Nuclear
Engineering - only to see the Nuclear energy field close to new designs.

Then there the students who did the graduate work in high energy physics -
only to see Star Wars end.

Then there were the students who did graduate work in particle physics only
to have the supercollider terminated.

The promise of $10 Million shuttle launch costs created illusions of space
power stations, large space structures. nuclear tugs - we hired. we studied,
then the big layoff

There was joke at one time - If your cab driver in San Francisco was wearing
sandles - he had a Phd in high energy physics.

The list goes on and on.

Few of the really high tech projects last form entry in college to exit
with an advanced degree.

We send kids to NASA space Camps, do high school technical programs, but it
ends there - a great empty promise.

We constantly talk about graduating more technical folks - but do nothing to
make the fields stable or that profitable as compared to business degrees.

I'm not saying we need make work jobs to keep the technical folks employed -
but the simple goal of making more technical graduates without knowing how
or if they may be used is insane to say the least.

and the relationship to this thread is - Bolden go entice kids into
technical fields where the enticement usually features manned space as a
centerpiece - and oh by the way shut down manned space and go make the
Muslims feel good about their ancestors.


  #6  
Old July 9th 10, 01:45 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)[_1080_]
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Posts: 1
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

Brian Thorn wrote:
On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 20:28:12 -0800, Pat Flannery
wrote:

It's highly unlikely the ISS will ever repay even a small part of its
development, construction, and resupply costs in any sort of a
tangible economic way at any point in the future.


If the Salmonella vaccine pans out, it might already have.
Salmonellosis kills an estimated 3 million people a year, mostly in
the third world (142,000 were sickened in the US last year and 30
died).

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/0...a-vaccine.html

We have ten years or more of Space Station research ahead of us.
Reports of ISS's failure to earn its keep are greatly exaggerated.


Interesting had not heard about this. Thanks for sharing. I was aware
there was a lot of research being done, I just had not been paying close
attention to exactly what though.

Brian


--
Greg Moore
Ask me about lily, an RPI based CMC.


  #7  
Old July 9th 10, 01:49 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)[_1081_]
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Posts: 1
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

Val Kraut wrote:
Let's look at some basic history.



Sure, let me know when you get started.


In the 1950s and 1960s we pushed science and engineering, lots of
students were graduated:


Umm, I wouldn't agree on the 1950s... at least not until after Sputnik. You
might recall a little scare back then.


Then came the nuclear test ban treaty - and many high tech businesses
including electrical equipment houses bit the dust.


Really? I still see quite a few companies out there. Care to provide
specific examples? A company going out of business is correlation, not
causation, so please cite proof.


Then we cancelled Apollo, cancelled the supersonic transport etc and
there was mass uneployment on the technical fields. They even made a
movie with George Kennedy as a surplused engineer called An American
Tragedy.


Again, provide examples.


Then there were the students who got advanced degrees in Nuclear
Engineering - only to see the Nuclear energy field close to new
designs.
Then there the students who did the graduate work in high energy
physics - only to see Star Wars end.


And funny, I know folks who were grad students then who are researchers now
in high energy physics. Star Wars didn't seem to end their jobs.


Then there were the students who did graduate work in particle
physics only to have the supercollider terminated.

The promise of $10 Million shuttle launch costs created illusions of
space power stations, large space structures. nuclear tugs - we
hired. we studied, then the big layoff


We did? Oh come off it. Most people in the industry knew the numbers were
BS from day one.


There was joke at one time - If your cab driver in San Francisco was
wearing sandles - he had a Phd in high energy physics.

The list goes on and on.


Anyone can talk about anecdotes. The plural of anecdote is not data.


Few of the really high tech projects last form entry in college to
exit with an advanced degree.

We send kids to NASA space Camps, do high school technical programs,
but it ends there - a great empty promise.

We constantly talk about graduating more technical folks - but do
nothing to make the fields stable or that profitable as compared to
business degrees.
I'm not saying we need make work jobs to keep the technical folks
employed - but the simple goal of making more technical graduates
without knowing how or if they may be used is insane to say the least.

and the relationship to this thread is - Bolden go entice kids into
technical fields where the enticement usually features manned space
as a centerpiece - and oh by the way shut down manned space and go
make the Muslims feel good about their ancestors.


--
Greg Moore
Ask me about lily, an RPI based CMC.


  #8  
Old July 9th 10, 04:49 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Craig Bingman
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Posts: 12
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

In article ,
Brian Thorn wrote:
On Wed, 07 Jul 2010 20:28:12 -0800, Pat Flannery
wrote:

It's highly unlikely the ISS will ever repay even a small part of its
development, construction, and resupply costs in any sort of a tangible
economic way at any point in the future.


If the Salmonella vaccine pans out, it might already have.


I'm not convinced that any of the critical steps on the way to a salmonella
vaccine had anything to do with experiments done in space. Sorry.

--
--


  #9  
Old July 9th 10, 06:44 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Val Kraut
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Posts: 329
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden


According to Astrogenetix, the Salmonella mutates in low gravity into a
more virulent form, and then they extract mutant DNA from it to make into
a vaccine that can defeat the less virulent earthly forms.
If anyone thinks that bringing organisms back to Earth that have mutated
into more virulent forms in space is a bad idea, I fully agree.
This sounds like Fred Hoyle's Comet-Borne Flu Germs being done on purpose.


The Andromeda Strain rides again - and so when it comes back and gets loose
the Salmonnella death rate goes up. Sounds like mad science at it's best.
Make a great movie - Salmonella deaths are up - Dustin Hoffman and Rene
Russo trace the outbreaks to returnimg astronauts from the station, Head of
the drug Company and Government types try to get them killed before they
spill the beans.

This is crazier than the Mutated Tomatoes experiments a few years back.


  #10  
Old July 9th 10, 07:51 PM posted to sci.space.policy,sci.space.history
Pat Flannery
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Posts: 18,465
Default National Review blows its cork over NASA's Bolden

On 7/9/2010 4:45 AM, Greg D. Moore (Strider) wrote:

If the Salmonella vaccine pans out, it might already have.
Salmonellosis kills an estimated 3 million people a year, mostly in
the third world (142,000 were sickened in the US last year and 30
died).

http://dsc.discovery.com/news/2009/0...a-vaccine.html

We have ten years or more of Space Station research ahead of us.
Reports of ISS's failure to earn its keep are greatly exaggerated.


Interesting had not heard about this. Thanks for sharing. I was aware
there was a lot of research being done, I just had not been paying close
attention to exactly what though.


Although human testing of that vaccine was possibly going to start in
2010 according to the press releases, there has been no new info on it
since last September.
The company that did this research - Astrogenetix - now says they are
working on a MRSA vaccine*, and you don't hear about the Salmonella cure
anymo
http://www.astrogenetix.com/news-and-events
Read between the lines about what they are about:
http://www.astrogenetix.com/about-us
....and what they are about is getting government funding to do
experiments in space that make it look like worthwhile medical research
is being done by NASA.
They got started as a subsidiary of Astrotech Corporation, itself the
new name for Spacehab Inc.:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Astrotech_Corporation
(That in turn being a new name for Johnson Engineering.)
Nice work if you can get it, but I wouldn't expect to see much coming
out of the company for all the taxpayer dollars that go into it.
In interesting corporate news, one of their big boys just jumped ship on
them:
http://www.marke****ch.com/story/gen...ors-2010-06-17


* I expect the Common Cold vaccine to follow next year, followed by the
vaccine for the Boogie-Woogie Flu in 2012, and the vaccine against death
in 2013. :-D

Pat

 




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