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  #1  
Old January 2nd 04, 05:14 AM
Scott Lowther
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Default More good news

Scientists closely monitoring Yellowstone

Recent eruptions, 200 degree ground temperatures, bulging magma and 84
degree water
temperatures prompt heightened srutiny of park's geothermal activity

BILLINGS, Mont. -- Yellowstone National Park happens to be on top of one
of the largest
“super volcanoes” in the world. Geologists claim the Yellowstone Park
area has been on a
regular eruption cycle of 600,000 years. The last eruption was 640,000
years ago making the
next one long overdue. This next eruption could be 2,500 times the size
of the 1980 Mount
St. Helens eruption. Volcanologists have been tracking the movement of
magma under the
park and have calculated that, in parts of Yellowstone, the ground has
risen over seventy
centimeters this century.

In July, 2003, Yellowstone Park rangers closed the entire Norris Geyser
Basin because of
deformation of the land and excessive high ground temperatures. There is
an area that is 28
miles long by 7 miles wide that has bulged upward over five inches since
1996, and this year
the ground temperature on that bulge has reached over 200 degrees
(measured one inch below
ground level).

From:
http://www.proliberty.com/observer/20031219.htm

Okay. Can we PLEASE get the hell off this damned rock???


--
Scott Lowther, Engineer
Remove the obvious (capitalized) anti-spam
gibberish from the reply-to e-mail address
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  #2  
Old January 2nd 04, 09:05 AM
Paul F. Dietz
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Scott Lowther wrote:
Scientists closely monitoring Yellowstone


See also the USGS's Yellowstone Volcanism FAQ:

http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/faqs.html

Paul

  #3  
Old January 2nd 04, 04:13 PM
James Nicoll
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Default More good news

In article ,
Scott Lowther wrote:
Scientists closely monitoring Yellowstone

snip Yellowstone: not just for geology lessons anymore

From:
http://www.proliberty.com/observer/20031219.htm

Okay. Can we PLEASE get the hell off this damned rock???


No. I mean, in the sense the toolkit does not at present
exist.

It seems to me humans will likely continue to be present
on the Earth whether or not ET human populations are established
and it therefore makes sense to look at methods to survive Yellow-
stone or any of the other problem spots [1] should the worst
happen.

Food storage is an obvious first step. Not entirely certain
what to do about ash (not in the sense of stopping ashfall but limiting
the human deaths from it). I am mildly optimistic that this is a solvable
problem, much in the way limiting earthquake deaths was.


1: Who the heck ordered a major site for volcanism on the equator,
anyway?
--
"The Union Nationale has brought [Quebec] to the edge of an abyss.
With Social Credit you will take one step forward."

Camil Samson
  #4  
Old January 2nd 04, 05:47 PM
Gareth Slee
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Default More good news

"John Savard" wrote in message
...


Still, though, perhaps if Europe didn't have the United States looking
out for it, it would develop the will to survive, and defend its
freedom against the enemies of freedom itself, rather than continuing
to carp against all attempts to defend freedom.



You including Great Britain too?
If you are, then I must disagree. It has always defended itself against the
enemies of freedom.
I don't hear much carping here in Great Britain I can assure you...

--
Gareth Slee

Just a counter
http://www.garethslee.com/counter.htm


  #5  
Old January 2nd 04, 07:01 PM
James Nicoll
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Default More good news

In article ,
Joann Evans wrote:
James Nicoll wrote:

1: Who the heck ordered a major site for volcanism on the equator,
anyway?


Do you mean Kilimanjaro? It is a dormant volcano, you know.

http://www.everestnews.com/stories00...va11243002.htm

The Indonesian volcanos are not extinct and some of the historical
ones are associatedd with reports like 'The eruption was audible in China'.

One of the pre-historic eruptions is associated with a hige die-
back in humans. It might the reason humans are so inbred.

--
"The Union Nationale has brought [Quebec] to the edge of an abyss.
With Social Credit you will take one step forward."

Camil Samson
  #6  
Old January 2nd 04, 07:07 PM
Hop David
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Default More good news



Joann Evans wrote:
James Nicoll wrote:

1: Who the heck ordered a major site for volcanism on the equator,
anyway?



Do you mean Kilimanjaro? It is a dormant volcano, you know.

http://www.everestnews.com/stories00...va11243002.htm


More likely Chimborazo & other volcanoes where the Andes cross the equator.



--
Hop David
http://clowder.net/hop/index.html

  #7  
Old January 3rd 04, 01:49 AM
Paul F. Dietz
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Default More good news

James Nicoll wrote:

Food storage is an obvious first step. Not entirely certain
what to do about ash (not in the sense of stopping ashfall but limiting
the human deaths from it). I am mildly optimistic that this is a solvable
problem, much in the way limiting earthquake deaths was.


Food storage would be costly if done on a continuing basis. However,
if it were possible to trigger the eruption, food could be stockpiled
(and other preparations made) beforehand (and the eruption timed for
late fall.) The eruption could also be triggered before pressure
in the magma chamber grew too large, and so might be smaller than
a natural eruption.

How to trigger the eruption? One or more aimed impacts by moderate
sized asteroids, perhaps (or maybe very large, elongated metal
penetrators, made from asteroidal metal.)

Paul

  #8  
Old January 3rd 04, 07:46 AM
Paul F. Dietz
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Default More good news

Joann Evans wrote:

This sounds like putting out a fire in my house by blowing it up. It
would work, but I still have no house in the end...


If your house is going to blow up anyway, this is like blowing it up
when you've removed your furniture and are staying with your brother.

Paul

  #9  
Old January 3rd 04, 08:37 AM
Paul F. Dietz
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Default More good news

John Savard wrote:

But if it isn't going to blow up for 10,000 years, that may still not
be a good idea.


Oh, I don't know. If blowing things up now causes a smaller eruption
(read the FAQ -- small eruptions are much more common than the big
ones), then maybe by careful lancing the larger eruptions can be
avoided entirely.

Paul

  #10  
Old January 3rd 04, 05:11 PM
Ruediger Klaehn
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Default More good news

Scott Lowther wrote:

Scientists closely monitoring Yellowstone

Recent eruptions, 200 degree ground temperatures, bulging magma and 84
degree water
temperatures prompt heightened srutiny of park's geothermal activity

Think positive. Wouldn't that be a *huge* energy source? Correct me if I'm
wrong, but I always thought that violent volcanic eruptions are caused by
liquid rock with a lot of gases (mostly CO2) dissolved in it. The liquid
rock forms a huge subterran bubble and the gas tends to be at the top of
that bubble since it is lighter.

If you could drill a hole into the top of the magma bubble and release the
gas through a gas turbine, you could generate a lot of energy and prevent a
violent explosion. You would probably produce more CO2 than all fossil fuel
plants in the world combined, but that CO2 will find its way into the
atmosphere sooner or later anyway.

Once you got rid of the gases, you could use the thermal energy with
traditional steam-based geothermal power plants.
 




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