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Training report (observing report)



 
 
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  #1  
Old August 4th 14, 05:37 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Bill Owen
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Posts: 154
Default Training report (observing report)

A colleague and I were asked to train about 8 or 10 camp counselors on
the use of their six 70 mm refractors. Nice instruments, f/10 with
something like 35 and 10 mm eyepieces, 1x finder with the little
battery-powered red dot, alt-az mount. We set up on a turnout on
Angeles Crest Hwy (north of Los Angeles) at about 4900 ft elevation.

The counselors were all high school students -- one was already quite
knowledgeable about astronomy but I don't think had ever used a
telescope (all book learning) -- they all were very excited to be there.

Most of them dutifully installed their right-angle prism. Not I. And I
had a chance to teach one of the kids how to point the telescope with
both eyes open -- you know the trick, how to center the object as seen
by your "off" eye in the field of view of the telescope that you're
seeing with your "on" eye, and how as you got close the magnified
version would appear in the telescope. It took some explaining, but she
finally got it -- and the "oh wow!" when Saturn appeared made the whole
trip worthwhile. That, and just spending time under the Milky Way
pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.

We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,
Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC
fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was
still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we
mentioned it.

I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy
and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots.

-- Bill Owen
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  #2  
Old August 4th 14, 07:53 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
oriel36[_2_]
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Posts: 8,478
Default Training report (observing report)

On Monday, August 4, 2014 5:37:44 PM UTC+1, Bill Owen wrote:


That, and just spending time under the Milky Way

pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.



We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,

Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC

fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was

still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we

mentioned it.



I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy

and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots..



-- Bill Owen



Did you explain to them how to reference the annual motion of the constellations behind the Sun in sequence due to the orbital motion of the Earth. From this point of view these students get to appreciate the separate resolution for inner planetary retrogrades where Venus and Mercury swing out from behind the Sun in the opposite direction of the background stars (which are themselves moving due to the orbital motion of the Earth) and then swing back in front of the Sun and in the same direction of those stars -

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdFrE7hWj0A

This is entirely new and considering retrogrades haven't been touched for the last 500 years since Copernicus wrote the Commentariolis back in 1514, I suggest you teach them the difference between inner and outer retrograde motions and their separate resolutions.

Did you explain to them that the great astronomers used a different system where the Sun moved through the constellations in order to determine the orbital period of each planet.

  #3  
Old August 4th 14, 08:24 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Uncarollo2
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Posts: 803
Default Training report (observing report)

On Monday, August 4, 2014 1:53:09 PM UTC-5, oriel36 wrote:
On Monday, August 4, 2014 5:37:44 PM UTC+1, Bill Owen wrote:





That, and just spending time under the Milky Way




pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.








We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,




Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC




fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was




still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we




mentioned it.








I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy




and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots.








-- Bill Owen






Did you explain to them how to reference the annual motion of the constellations behind the Sun in sequence due to the orbital motion of the Earth. From this point of view these students get to appreciate the separate resolution for inner planetary retrogrades where Venus and Mercury swing out from behind the Sun in the opposite direction of the background stars (which are themselves moving due to the orbital motion of the Earth) and then swing back in front of the Sun and in the same direction of those stars -



https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdFrE7hWj0A



This is entirely new and considering retrogrades haven't been touched for the last 500 years since Copernicus wrote the Commentariolis back in 1514, I suggest you teach them the difference between inner and outer retrograde motions and their separate resolutions.



Did you explain to them that the great astronomers used a different system where the Sun moved through the constellations in order to determine the orbital period of each planet.


Yes he did. I was there and heard him tell people exactly what you said.

Uncaretrograde
  #4  
Old August 4th 14, 09:28 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
oriel36[_2_]
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Posts: 8,478
Default Training report (observing report)

On Monday, August 4, 2014 8:24:58 PM UTC+1, Uncarollo2 wrote:
On Monday, August 4, 2014 1:53:09 PM UTC-5, oriel36 wrote:

On Monday, August 4, 2014 5:37:44 PM UTC+1, Bill Owen wrote:












That, and just spending time under the Milky Way








pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.
















We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,








Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC








fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was








still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we








mentioned it.
















I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy








and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots.
















-- Bill Owen












Did you explain to them how to reference the annual motion of the constellations behind the Sun in sequence due to the orbital motion of the Earth.. From this point of view these students get to appreciate the separate resolution for inner planetary retrogrades where Venus and Mercury swing out from behind the Sun in the opposite direction of the background stars (which are themselves moving due to the orbital motion of the Earth) and then swing back in front of the Sun and in the same direction of those stars -








https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MdFrE7hWj0A








This is entirely new and considering retrogrades haven't been touched for the last 500 years since Copernicus wrote the Commentariolis back in 1514, I suggest you teach them the difference between inner and outer retrograde motions and their separate resolutions.








Did you explain to them that the great astronomers used a different system where the Sun moved through the constellations in order to determine the orbital period of each planet.




Yes he did. I was there and heard him tell people exactly what you said.



Uncaretrograde


Ah, the wonderful phrase of Dickens that sums up the productiveness of all eras - "It was the best of times, it was the worst of times, it was the age of wisdom, it was the age of foolishness, it was the epoch of belief, it was the epoch of incredulity, it was the season of Light, it was the season of Darkness, it was the spring of hope, it was the winter of despair, we had everything before us, we had nothing before us "

I said nothing,the visual narrative which alone belongs to the celestial arena relates the story of the motions of the planets and that of the stars behind the Sun,they alone are the authority which smiles on those who go outside and allow the observations in. The difference between now and twenty years ago is that the tools,and they are tools, are in front of us if you know how to use them properly and especially the ability to condense long term observations into more immediate form.

We who are astronomers borrow from the story but never dictate it and with each dawn and twilight it brings with it a new story to tell in those hearts which are kind and gentle.
  #5  
Old August 5th 14, 12:42 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
[email protected]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,472
Default Training report (observing report)

On Monday, August 4, 2014 12:37:44 PM UTC-4, Bill Owen wrote:
A colleague and I were asked to train about 8 or 10 camp counselors on
the use of their six 70 mm refractors.


edit

We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,
Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC
fans present),


https://identity.usc.edu/print/colors/

https://identity.usc.edu/print/color-combinations/

BTW, you made no mention of observing with a video cam... are you a "dinosaur?" :-)




  #6  
Old August 5th 14, 02:16 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Sketcher
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Posts: 291
Default Training report (observing report)

Hi Bill, thanks for the report and for your work in popularizing our hobby. I'm sure the camp counselors will transfer some of their newly acquired knowledge, expertise and enthusiasm to many more.

Sketcher,
To sketch is to see.

On Monday, August 4, 2014 10:37:44 AM UTC-6, Bill Owen wrote:
A colleague and I were asked to train about 8 or 10 camp counselors on
the use of their six 70 mm refractors. Nice instruments, f/10 with
something like 35 and 10 mm eyepieces, 1x finder with the little
battery-powered red dot, alt-az mount. We set up on a turnout on
Angeles Crest Hwy (north of Los Angeles) at about 4900 ft elevation.

The counselors were all high school students -- one was already quite
knowledgeable about astronomy but I don't think had ever used a
telescope (all book learning) -- they all were very excited to be there.

Most of them dutifully installed their right-angle prism. Not I. And I
had a chance to teach one of the kids how to point the telescope with
both eyes open -- you know the trick, how to center the object as seen
by your "off" eye in the field of view of the telescope that you're
seeing with your "on" eye, and how as you got close the magnified
version would appear in the telescope. It took some explaining, but she
finally got it -- and the "oh wow!" when Saturn appeared made the whole
trip worthwhile. That, and just spending time under the Milky Way
pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.

We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,
Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC
fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was
still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we
mentioned it.

I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy
and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots.

-- Bill Owen


  #7  
Old August 5th 14, 03:30 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
palsing[_2_]
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Posts: 3,068
Default Training report (observing report)

On Monday, August 4, 2014 9:37:44 AM UTC-7, Bill Owen wrote:
A colleague and I were asked to train about 8 or 10 camp counselors on

the use of their six 70 mm refractors. Nice instruments, f/10 with

something like 35 and 10 mm eyepieces, 1x finder with the little

battery-powered red dot, alt-az mount. We set up on a turnout on

Angeles Crest Hwy (north of Los Angeles) at about 4900 ft elevation.



The counselors were all high school students -- one was already quite

knowledgeable about astronomy but I don't think had ever used a

telescope (all book learning) -- they all were very excited to be there.



Most of them dutifully installed their right-angle prism. Not I. And I

had a chance to teach one of the kids how to point the telescope with

both eyes open -- you know the trick, how to center the object as seen

by your "off" eye in the field of view of the telescope that you're

seeing with your "on" eye, and how as you got close the magnified

version would appear in the telescope. It took some explaining, but she

finally got it -- and the "oh wow!" when Saturn appeared made the whole

trip worthwhile. That, and just spending time under the Milky Way

pointing out the constellations and telling their stories.



We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,

Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC

fans present), epsilon Lyrae ... M31 was a good target although it was

still low in the NE ... don't know if any of them found M57 although we

mentioned it.



I love doing this sort of thing. Not only is it fun to spread the joy

and wonder of the night sky, it also helps me stay in touch with my roots.



-- Bill Owen


Bill, I've been doing this stuff at grammar schools in Orange & L.A. counties for years. It is a lot of fun to teach these little sponge-brains, they are quick to understand the basics, and the positive feedback I receive from them makes it all worthwhile.

\Paul A, a dinosaur through-and-through
  #8  
Old August 5th 14, 10:22 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
oriel36[_2_]
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Posts: 8,478
Default Training report (observing report)

On Tuesday, August 5, 2014 2:16:46 AM UTC+1, Sketcher wrote:
Hi Bill, thanks for the report and for your work in popularizing our hobby. I'm sure the camp counselors will transfer some of their newly acquired knowledge, expertise and enthusiasm to many more.



Sketcher,

To sketch is to see.



Positively viral wouldn't you say ?. It would be just as easy to teach these open young minds the proper principles if the observers themselves had an expansive view of astronomy but unfortunately people are being poisoned from one generation to the next so it is less a hobby than a destructive habit.
  #9  
Old August 5th 14, 05:23 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Uncarollo2
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Posts: 803
Default Training report (observing report)

On Tuesday, August 5, 2014 4:22:13 AM UTC-5, oriel36 wrote:


The cooperation between you all can be quite remarkable but it is the type of mob cooperation that works against astronomy for how else to account for the cloak of obscurity covering some of the most enjoyable insights imaginable including new ones made possible with the ability to condense long term observations into visual narratives.


Wonderful word salad. Well done, well done!

Uncawordie
  #10  
Old August 5th 14, 05:37 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Bill Owen
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Posts: 154
Default Training report (observing report)

On 08/04/14 16:42, wrote:
On Monday, August 4, 2014 12:37:44 PM UTC-4, Bill Owen wrote:
A colleague and I were asked to train about 8 or 10 camp counselors on
the use of their six 70 mm refractors.


edit

We stayed until about 10:30, looked the crescent moon, Mars and Saturn,
Albireo (my colleague called it "the UCLA star" to the dismay of the USC
fans present),


https://identity.usc.edu/print/colors/

https://identity.usc.edu/print/color-combinations/

BTW, you made no mention of observing with a video cam... are you a "dinosaur?" :-)


No video cams, no GOTO mounts, not a single luxury ... my colleague had
a green laser pointer for showing the constellations though. Does that
count for anything? :-)

I may be a dinosaur, but I'm not extinct yet.

-- Bill


 




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