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Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse



 
 
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  #1  
Old April 6th 18, 08:24 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

The daily motion of the surface across the fully illuminated face on the September Equinox follows, at least from an orbital perspective, a Northwest to Southeast path -

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deep_S...-tilt-23.4.gif

The motion of the surface on the March Equinox should follow a Southwest to Northeast path but NASA has chose to present an unacceptable perspective opposed to that excellent time lapse above -

https://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov/

Only on the Solstice does the surface appear to move West to East parallel to the orbital plane -

https://epic.gsfc.nasa.gov/?date=2017-06-21



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  #2  
Old April 6th 18, 07:03 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Razzmatazz
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 2:24:54 AM UTC-5, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
The daily motion ....


I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.

  #3  
Old April 6th 18, 07:18 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Bill[_9_]
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 11:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Razzmatazz wrote:

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 2:24:54 AM UTC-5, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
The daily motion ....


I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.


Shhh!!! We don't let the secret out. ;-)
--
Email address is a Spam trap.
  #4  
Old April 6th 18, 08:29 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 11:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Razzmatazz
wrote:

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 2:24:54 AM UTC-5, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
The daily motion ....


I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.


At least it didn't hit you over the head!
  #5  
Old April 7th 18, 08:12 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 7:03:59 PM UTC+1, Razzmatazz wrote:
On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 2:24:54 AM UTC-5, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
The daily motion ....


I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me..


You are so sweet, celestial sphere enthusiasts even have the Sun disappear and reappear using the diameter from horizon to horizon as a gauge for the Sun's motion -

http://www.debsnelsonphotography.com...m-720-Copy.jpg


I could probably explain the joke of civil/nautical/ astronomical twilight this way but unfortunately someone selling a magnification hobby as astronomy is not going to know or care so I don't take offence.


Remember now, it is the astronomers who condense long term imaging into manageable observations that will understand why only one apparent motion of the stars matter in relation to the Sun and the orbital motion of the Earth so celestial sphere motion ain't it.







  #6  
Old April 9th 18, 09:06 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 7:18:59 PM UTC+1, Bill wrote:
On Fri, 6 Apr 2018 11:03:55 -0700 (PDT), Razzmatazz wrote:

On Friday, April 6, 2018 at 2:24:54 AM UTC-5, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
The daily motion ....


I stayed up all night to see where the sun went, and then it dawned on me.


Shhh!!! We don't let the secret out. ;-)



I do not know what it must take to assign significance to circumpolar motion and then conclude that all the effects of daily rotation including sunrise/sunset (as observers see rotation) fall out of step -

" It is a fact not generally known that,owing to the difference between solar and sidereal time,the Earth rotates upon its axis once more often than there are days in the year" NASA /Harvard

I would not presume that people here have the slightest interest in correcting the centuries old error but my goodness, what cheap nonsense below any standard of intelligence.

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/kenya/nairobi


Sunrise/sunset times don't change much near the Equator so each rotation is captured by that experience so rather than deal with the catastrophe, the celestial sphere enthusiasts left SAA en masse rather than face the scar on astronomy. Never have such a section in society enjoyed being settled into a suffocating notion even when the opportunity is there to escape it with all the lovely challenges ahead.


  #7  
Old April 9th 18, 10:34 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Quadibloc
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 2:06:21 AM UTC-6, Gerald Kelleher wrote:

I do not know what it must take to assign significance to circumpolar motion
and then conclude that all the effects of daily rotation including
sunrise/sunset (as observers see rotation) fall out of step -


" It is a fact not generally known that,owing to the difference between solar
and sidereal time,the Earth rotates upon its axis once more often than there
are days in the year" NASA /Harvard


I would not presume that people here have the slightest interest in correcting
the centuries old error but my goodness, what cheap nonsense below any
standard of intelligence.


http://www.quadibloc.com/science/eot.htm

The solar day is affected by the Equation of Time.

Stellar circumpolar motion is not.

The Equation of Time is the result of the Earth's orbital motion. So it means
that the solar day is a compound motion, combining the Earth's rotation with the
Earth's orbital motion, not a simple one - just as the apparent motion of the
planets, with their retrogrades, is a compound motion, combining their own
orbital motion around the Sun with the Earth's orbital motion around the Sun.

So you're the one who is being stubbornly geocentric and non-Copernican with
this issue.

John Savard
  #8  
Old April 9th 18, 10:20 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

Not in a million years could observers connect sunset/ sunrise where the stars are in view with sunrise/sunset when the Sun is in view thereby completing one rotation. Makes it easy to understand close to the Equator where variations are minimal -

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/kenya/nairobi

There is not enough in the theorist side of things to keep anything going apart from a few speaking in a secret language to themselves within the walls of universities. The consequence of RA/Dec (celestial sphere reckoning) was not 'big bang', it is a society unable to account for a single sunrise to sunrise ,sunset to sunset or more importantly a noon to noon cycle which anchors rotation to AM/PM and the Lat/Long system.

Wish the nuisances would stay to their own threads.
  #9  
Old April 10th 18, 03:51 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
palsing[_2_]
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Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 2:20:50 PM UTC-7, Gerald Kelleher wrote:

Wish the nuisances would stay to their own threads.


And I assure you that we nuances feel exactly the same about you...

  #10  
Old April 10th 18, 07:14 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 1,551
Default Actual time lapse vs distorted time lapse

On Tuesday, April 10, 2018 at 3:51:23 AM UTC+1, palsing wrote:
On Monday, April 9, 2018 at 2:20:50 PM UTC-7, Gerald Kelleher wrote:

Wish the nuisances would stay to their own threads.


And I assure you that we nuances feel exactly the same about you...


To be fair to you, you are more restrained than the actual nuisances who think they are doing everyone a favor by spraying graffiti on a genuine point.

https://www.timeanddate.com/sun/kenya/nairobi

With the stars in view from sunset to sunrise and the Sun in view from sunrise to sunset , what is a more natural way to appreciate one rotation of the Earth as the most immediate experience of the cycle you, I and everyone else lives by -

https://bioneuroblog.files.wordpress...04/orobio4.png


I don't fault the people who drew the wrong conclusion back in the late 17th century as it give you the excellent predictive framework of RA/Dec however it compounded a fundamental question that was central to the Galileo affair -

Can the system which predicts astronomical events also be used for planetary dynamics and solar system structure through observations ?.

The answer is found in your inability to affirm that the data in a simple sunrise/sunset/sunrise values represents a single rotation of the Earth.




 




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