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How cool is VL2



 
 
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  #11  
Old February 25th 07, 07:42 AM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Brad Guth[_2_]
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Posts: 3,941
Default How cool is VL2

"Bill Snyder" wrote in message


"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] e.mailgate.org

You folks do realize just how cool Venus L2 is, don't you?


Venus isn't cool, retard, and neither are you.


My God almighty, you silly folks actually don't know the difference
between Venus and that of Venus L2.

No wonder you're all so snookered and thus easily dumbfounded past the
point of no return. Here I'd thought I was merely stuck with the sorts
of having to fend off MI/NSA~MIB spooks, moles and/or the army of their
minion borgs (apparently fully incest cloned borgs none the less), when
in fact we're dealing with something far less qualified than a village
idiot, and highly bigoted lot to boot.

Sorry about all that. My mistake.
-
Brad Guth


--
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  #12  
Old February 25th 07, 01:15 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Prai Jei
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default How cool is VL2

Brad Guth (or somebody else of the same name) wrote thusly in message
lgate.org:

"Bill Snyder" wrote in message


"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] e.mailgate.org

You folks do realize just how cool Venus L2 is, don't you?


Venus isn't cool, retard, and neither are you.


My God almighty, you silly folks actually don't know the difference
between Venus and that of Venus L2.


I wonder what they think the Trojan Position might be
--
He hadde not leyser for to loke after who is his freend & who is his fo.
- The Cloud of Unknowing (anon, 14th century)

Interchange the alphabetic letter groups to reply
  #13  
Old February 25th 07, 03:35 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Bill Snyder
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 377
Default How cool is VL2

On Sun, 25 Feb 2007 06:42:31 +0000 (UTC), "Brad Guth"
wrote:

"Bill Snyder" wrote in message


"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] e.mailgate.org

You folks do realize just how cool Venus L2 is, don't you?


Venus isn't cool, retard, and neither are you.


My God almighty, you silly folks actually don't know the difference
between Venus and that of Venus L2.

No wonder you're all so snookered and thus easily dumbfounded past the
point of no return. Here I'd thought I was merely stuck with the sorts
of having to fend off MI/NSA~MIB spooks, moles and/or the army of their
minion borgs (apparently fully incest cloned borgs none the less), when
in fact we're dealing with something far less qualified than a village
idiot, and highly bigoted lot to boot.

Sorry about all that. My mistake.


So when you posted all those messages to a thread that you titled "Our
moon is hot, Venus is not," you really meant the L2 point? When you
said, "Venus has certainly been a little different and perhaps a whole
lot more planetology rare on behalf of having accommodated intelligent
other life than Earth," you meant space-based life? When you said,
"You folks do realize that a fully manned rigid airship that's
cruising efficiently just below those cool nighttime clouds could
actually require some auxiliary cabin heat." -- that Zep would be
cruising through clouds at the L2 point?

Liar, lunatic, and retard.


--
Bill Snyder [This space unintentionally left blank.]
  #14  
Old February 25th 07, 05:10 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
The Ghost In The Machine
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Posts: 546
Default How cool is VL2

In sci.physics, Brad Guth

wrote
on Sun, 25 Feb 2007 02:34:40 +0000 (UTC)
lgate.org:
"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] .mailgate.org

You folks do realize just how cool Venus L2 is, don't you?

On average, VL2 is much cooler than what ISS has to deal with.

It's actually cool enough for accommodating a plastic Bigelow POOF, as
to survive rather nicely within VL2.
http://www.bigelowaerospace.com/
http://www.thespacereview.com/article/187/1
http://flyingsinger.blogspot.com/200...s-genesis.html
-
Brad Guth


Um...forgive me for asking such a stupid question, but since space is so
tenuous anyway how does one measure the temperature of a point therein?
A better measurement is insolation or irradiation, especially if
something is trapped in a bubble (e.g., a spacecraft with some air,
water, etc. in it).

Also, I'm not entirely sure but presumably the Venus L2 point is much
farther away than low Earth orbit, or the Moon, making for certain
logistics difficulties (and higher expense).

--
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  #15  
Old February 25th 07, 10:47 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Brad Guth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,941
Default How cool is VL2

"The Ghost In The Machine" wrote in
message

Um...forgive me for asking such a stupid question, but since space is so
tenuous anyway how does one measure the temperature of a point therein?
A better measurement is insolation or irradiation, especially if
something is trapped in a bubble (e.g., a spacecraft with some air,
water, etc. in it).


It's all basic physics and math, either of which I'm not terribly good
at, but supposedly you folks are. So, why don't you tell us what a POOF
space station at VL2 is in for?

At VL2 you've got roughly upon the spectrum average of 2550~2600 w/m2,
less whatever's the shade provided by Venus (which is a serious bunch
of shade).


Also, I'm not entirely sure but presumably the Venus L2 point is much
farther away than low Earth orbit, or the Moon, making for certain
logistics difficulties (and higher expense).


Each and every 19 months, your the same face of Venus that comes to
within roughly 100 fold the distance of our moon. Therefore, you could
damn near toss a moon rock at Venus, and expect that rock to eventually
hit that big sucker (though perhaps not until the next 19 month cycle).

Whatever the logistics wouldn't be at most 10% of accomplishing Mars,
perhaps not 1% of our actually accomplishing any viable base camp upon
our own nasty and otherwise global warming moon, and to think that you
wouldn't have to pack along hardly any spare amounts of shielding or
energy for surviving within your composite rigid waverider airship, or
otherwise for the 19 month stay within the relatively cool VL2 POOF, nor
would your mission be having need of all that much spare energy for your
return trip from VL2 to Earth because, your exit energy demand from VL2
would be next to nothing, other than the wussy gravity pull of the sun,
that's you're leaving behind at good velocity.

Put any one of our spendy orbital do-everything supercomputers to work
on it, and then give us that fully 3D animated GOOGLE/NOVA production
quality run-through.
-
Brad Guth


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #16  
Old February 25th 07, 10:48 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Brad Guth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,941
Default How cool is VL2

"Brad Guth" wrote in message
news:[email protected] .mailgate.org

In addition to all that's clearly ongoing as taboo/nondisclosure
(damage-control) about anything Venus, it seems there's still more news
that we can all use about our silly moon which hasn't quite been walked
upon.

NASA insiders expose Apollo Hoax / banished from Mailgate

http://groups.google.com/group/sci.p...2a2ea85ea88d70

http://mygate.mailgate.org/mynews/sc...smart&p=1/1963
If these folks accept the fundamental notions that our warm and fuzzy
NASA/Apollo can manage to have photographed our moon's physically dark
terrain along with mother Earth as coexisting within the same FOV, and
especially interesting is of their Kodak film's DR(dynamic range) as
having rather easily recorded portions of our dark oceans that are worth
an albedo of perhaps 0.1 (entirely similar enough as to the moon
itself), whereas the absolute impressive and somewhat blue/violet peak
spectrum as representing the vibrance of Venus should have been
unavoidably recorded as well. Especially well recorded via those
unfiltered optics that should otherwise have been nearly if not
overloaded with such a gauntlet of all those extra near-UV and UV-a
spectrums worth of photons as having reacted rather nicely with those
highly reflective clouds which offers us the visual albedo of 0.7~0.8 to
work with, whereas the actual peak solar spectrum energy and roughly
reflecting 75% of that 4 kw/m2 is what the naked and unfiltered Kodak
eye had to deal with.

Yet lo and behold, not even from orbit or from those supposed EVAs upon
the deck had there once been any sign of Venus, much less of any other
significant planets, as well as never once accommodating the
bluish-white vibrant speck of the Sirius star system, all of which were
well within the DR(dynamic range) of those unfiltered Kodak moments, yet
as though such significant items were never once to be seen (especially
odd as of those NASA/Apollo missions A11, A14 and A16).

As I've often stipulated before, that most any interactive 3D solar
system simulator puts Venus smack within good EVA obtained view of at
least those three missions (always within each command module's orbital
view), and I might as well further add, that we have those free
cellphone cameras with far better DR and of a wider spectrum capability
than what our newest MESSENGER mirror optics and spendy 14+db CCD could
apparently muster, as proof-positive via their flyby of Earth which only
provided a rather naked looking and otherwise somewhat pastel view of
Earth, w/o even so much as once accommodating our physically dark moon,
much less having shared upon any other significant planets or stars that
simply had to be there, yet all such other items were artificially made
as invisible/stealth as were all of those Muslim WMD.

Remember that starshine as well as earthshine upon the moon is
absolutely vibrant to the unfiltered Kodak eye that's far more sensitive
to having recorded such near-UV and UV-a spectrums than our human eye,
which can't hardly if even detect, not to mention those pesky gamma and
hard-X-ray spectrums of which that moon of our's is absolutely chuck
full of such TBI(total body irradiation) dosage that's simply much worse
off than any lethal hot zone within our Van Allen belts, and that's
still not even including upon all of the continual thermal trauma of
their having to survive those double IR/FIR spectrums that also
coexisted, as coming at their naked moonsuit from nearly all surrounding
directions in addition to whatever sol was directly contributing.

That physically dark and somewhat salty moon of ours is what's actually
a darn good IR/FIR reflector, and otherwise represents a rather ****
poor UV reflector because, such UV energy often gets absorbed and/or
interacts as creating secondary/recoil photons of the [UV black light
generated] near-blue spectrum. Of course the solar and cosmic influx is
what also represents lethal buttloads of having generated those
secondary/recoil photons of gamma and hard-X-rays, with zilch worth of
any attenuation from all possible directions, meaning that your wussy
moonsuit is surrounded by an absolute minimum lethal gauntlet of 3.14e6
m2 that's contributing the full secondary spectrum worth of whatever's
downright nasty if not lethal to your frail DNA, as well as continually
impacting each and every physically more than boiling role of all that
sensitive Kodak film.

Wayne Throop:
If you substitute venus for earth, it'd show up in the shot.
Even if you move earth far away, it'd still show up, until it's so far
away its light is falling on less than a single grain of the photograph;
but as long as its idealized image is at least a single grain big, that
grain would still be exposed.


Instead, we see a somewhat naked guano island like reflective
environment, for as far as the human and unfiltered Kodak eyes could
see, in places having a thin and naturally terrestrial clumping 50/50
dusting of portland cement and cornmeal that was entirely xenon lamp
spectrum illuminated (meaning w/o UV), whereas instead of their having
to deal with whatever the raw and nearly point source of the extremely
contrasty solar spectrum should have had to offer, along with such raw
influx having unavoidably shared absolute extra loads worth of the
near-UV and UV-a energy. Therefore, there's absolutely nothing of such
hocus-pocus artificial content within such bogus images, or otherwise of
mission associated content, that's worth a freaking hoot, much less a
scientific hoot.

Of course there's many other iffy if not downright naysay worthy
fly-by-rocket and unproven lander factors that simply do not add up to
what those pesky regular laws of physics and of replicated science and
of otherwise proven technology has to say.

Sorry that the likes of "Wayne Throop", "rick_so" and myself as your
pesky historical revisionist team, and otherwise truth telling
messengers from hell, must continually **** on your silly hocus-pocus
parade.
-
Brad Guth

Of a similar topic that's worthy of disclosure interest:
Velikovsky/Neocatastrophism Sources / banished from Mailgate

http://groups.google.com/group/rec.o...a52739c889bcc2

http://mygate.mailgate.org/mynews/rec/rec.org.mensa/Pbb1h.956$CT5.551%40trnddc02?order=smart&p=1/469


--
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  #17  
Old February 25th 07, 11:06 PM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Prai Jei
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 42
Default How cool is VL2

Brad Guth (or somebody else of the same name) wrote thusly in message
lgate.org:

It's all basic physics and math, either of which I'm not terribly good
at, but supposedly you folks are. So, why don't you tell us what a POOF
space station at VL2 is in for?


Sounds a bit queer to me.
--
He hadde not leyser for to loke after who is his freend & who is his fo.
- The Cloud of Unknowing (anon, 14th century)

Interchange the alphabetic letter groups to reply
  #18  
Old February 26th 07, 02:51 AM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
The Ghost In The Machine
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 546
Default How cool is VL2

In sci.physics, Brad Guth

wrote
on Sun, 25 Feb 2007 21:47:22 +0000 (UTC)
lgate.org:
"The Ghost In The Machine" wrote in
message

Um...forgive me for asking such a stupid question, but since space is so
tenuous anyway how does one measure the temperature of a point therein?
A better measurement is insolation or irradiation, especially if
something is trapped in a bubble (e.g., a spacecraft with some air,
water, etc. in it).


It's all basic physics and math, either of which I'm not terribly good
at, but supposedly you folks are. So, why don't you tell us what a POOF
space station at VL2 is in for?

At VL2 you've got roughly upon the spectrum average of 2550~2600 w/m2,
less whatever's the shade provided by Venus (which is a serious bunch
of shade).


Somehow, I seriously doubt the VL2 point would get all that much shade.
But lessee.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lagrangian_point

mentions the concept of a Hill Sphere, which has radius

r =~ R * cuberoot(M2/3M1)

where M1 is presumably 1.998435 * 10^30 kg, M2 4.8685 * 10^24 kg,
and R 1.08208926000 * 10^11 m. This gives r = 1.01 * 10^9 m.
At that distance the angular displacement of Venus, which has
diameter about 1.2 * 10^4 m, will be 1.2 * 10^-5 radian.
The angular displacement of Sol, which has diameter 1.392 * 10^9 m,
will be 1.286 * 10^-2 radian.

One should see Venus as a dot against the Sun, but that's about it.

Looks to me to be about a 0.0001% reduction in insolation -- which
is basically nothing.



Also, I'm not entirely sure but presumably the Venus L2 point is much
farther away than low Earth orbit, or the Moon, making for certain
logistics difficulties (and higher expense).


Each and every 19 months, your the same face of Venus that comes to
within roughly 100 fold the distance of our moon. Therefore, you could
damn near toss a moon rock at Venus, and expect that rock to eventually
hit that big sucker (though perhaps not until the next 19 month cycle).


Moon distance: 3.85 * 10^8 m
Venusian distance: maybe 4.2 * 10^10 m


Whatever the logistics wouldn't be at most 10% of accomplishing Mars,
perhaps not 1% of our actually accomplishing any viable base camp upon
our own nasty and otherwise global warming moon, and to think that you
wouldn't have to pack along hardly any spare amounts of shielding or
energy for surviving within your composite rigid waverider airship, or
otherwise for the 19 month stay within the relatively cool VL2 POOF, nor
would your mission be having need of all that much spare energy for your
return trip from VL2 to Earth because, your exit energy demand from VL2
would be next to nothing, other than the wussy gravity pull of the sun,
that's you're leaving behind at good velocity.

Put any one of our spendy orbital do-everything supercomputers to work
on it, and then give us that fully 3D animated GOOGLE/NOVA production
quality run-through.
-
Brad Guth




--
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  #19  
Old February 26th 07, 03:02 AM posted to uk.sci.astronomy,sci.space.history,sci.physics,sci.astro
Brad Guth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,941
Default How cool is VL2

"Prai Jei" wrote in message


Brad Guth (or somebody else of the same name) wrote thusly in message
lgate.org:

It's all basic physics and math, either of which I'm not terribly good
at, but supposedly you folks are. So, why don't you tell us what a POOF
space station at VL2 is in for?


Sounds a bit queer to me.


So, you are playing it dumb and dumber. Is there a good physics or
whatever science reason for this?
-
Brad Guth




--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
  #20  
Old February 26th 07, 11:23 PM posted to sci.space.history,uk.sci.astronomy,sci.physics,sci.astro
Brad Guth[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 3,941
Default How cool is VL2

"The Ghost In The Machine" wrote in
message

Somehow, I seriously doubt the VL2 point would get all that much shade.
But lessee.

One should see Venus as a dot against the Sun, but that's about it.

Looks to me to be about a 0.0001% reduction in insolation -- which
is basically nothing.


Venus L2 is only worth an isolation of "0.0001%"(??????), and here I
thought my math was pretty bad off.

Would you like to try that one more time?

I've got AutoCad. What have you got to work with?

Try to remember that VL2 (1.0143e6 km 1.0142e6 km) isn't all that far
away from Venus. I'm thinking at least 85% isolation, and a bit more
isolation if we're taking that 100+ km elevated deck of thick clouds
into account.
-
Brad Guth


--
Posted via Mailgate.ORG Server - http://www.Mailgate.ORG
 




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