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Bacteria in spaeships



 
 
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  #21  
Old June 27th 18, 09:15 PM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
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Posts: 50
Default Bacteria in spaeships

What are we going to do about preventing Earth bacteria
from contaminating Mars biota when we set foot on Mars?

You're assuming that there is an actual living Mars biota. This has
not been proven. There are signs that Mars may have had life in the
distant past, but we do not have any definitive evidence that proves
life exists on Mars today.


Isn't my assumption. It's NASA's.


Please cite this NASA assumption that there is an actual living Mars
biota. Note that spacecraft sterilization efforts do not demonstrate
such an assumption, since we did the same thing for lunar probes and
nobody thought there was an actual living biota there.


Then why are they sterilizing landers?
Do they also sterilize satellites?

As for the moon, did they sterilize the suits used for moon walks?
Did the moon lander or the moon walkers expell any air while on the
moon?
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  #22  
Old June 27th 18, 11:00 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 9,663
Default Bacteria in spaeships

William Elliot wrote on Wed, 27 Jun 2018 13:15:44
-0700:

What are we going to do about preventing Earth bacteria
from contaminating Mars biota when we set foot on Mars?

You're assuming that there is an actual living Mars biota. This has
not been proven. There are signs that Mars may have had life in the
distant past, but we do not have any definitive evidence that proves
life exists on Mars today.

Isn't my assumption. It's NASA's.


Please cite this NASA assumption that there is an actual living Mars
biota. Note that spacecraft sterilization efforts do not demonstrate
such an assumption, since we did the same thing for lunar probes and
nobody thought there was an actual living biota there.


Then why are they sterilizing landers?


Because they don't want cross contamination on their instruments.
Which part of "spacecraft sterilization efforts do not demonstrate
such an assumption" was it that confused you?


Do they also sterilize satellites?


Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.


As for the moon, did they sterilize the suits used for moon walks?


Yes.


Did the moon lander or the moon walkers expell any air while on the
moon?


The lander probably did, since you had to evacuate the lander to get
out. The moon walkers, no. And the air would have been fairly
sterile.


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
  #23  
Old June 28th 18, 04:02 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
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Posts: 50
Default Bacteria in spaeships

On Wed, 27 Jun 2018, Fred J. McCall wrote:

Then why are they sterilizing landers?


Because they don't want cross contamination on their instruments.


Do they also sterilize satellites?

Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.


For what reason? Sensitive instruments?

As for the moon, did they sterilize the suits used for moon walks?

Yes.


Why?

Did the moon lander or the moon walkers expell any air while on the
moon?


What for? Certainly not to avoid cross
contamination on their instruments.

The lander probably did, since you had to evacuate the lander to get
out. The moon walkers, no. And the air would have been fairly
sterile.

  #24  
Old June 28th 18, 04:21 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
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Posts: 9,663
Default Bacteria in spaeships

William Elliot wrote on Wed, 27 Jun 2018 20:02:01
-0700:

On Wed, 27 Jun 2018, Fred J. McCall wrote:

Then why are they sterilizing landers?


Because they don't want cross contamination on their instruments.


Do they also sterilize satellites?

Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.


For what reason? Sensitive instruments?


Because you don't want things growing on your expensive satellite that
you can't get up to clean.

As for the moon, did they sterilize the suits used for moon walks?

Yes.


Why?


Which part of 'prevent cross contamination' is it that is confusing
you?

Did the moon lander or the moon walkers expell any air while on the
moon?


What for? Certainly not to avoid cross
contamination on their instruments.


What the hell are you asking about?

The lander probably did, since you had to evacuate the lander to get
out. The moon walkers, no. And the air would have been fairly
sterile.


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
  #25  
Old June 29th 18, 03:06 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default Bacteria in spaeships

Then why are they sterilizing landers?
Because they don't want cross contamination on their instruments.


Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.


For what reason? Sensitive instruments?


Because you don't want things growing on your expensive satellite
that you can't get up to clean.


Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?
  #26  
Old June 29th 18, 04:46 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,663
Default Bacteria in spaeships

William Elliot wrote on Thu, 28 Jun 2018 19:06:40
-0700:

Then why are they sterilizing landers?
Because they don't want cross contamination on their instruments.

Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.

For what reason? Sensitive instruments?


Because you don't want things growing on your expensive satellite
that you can't get up to clean.


Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?


No, because we sterilize the things and build them in clean rooms. On
the other hand, see Russian experience with Mir...


--
"Ignorance is preferable to error, and he is less remote from the
truth who believes nothing than he who believes what is wrong."
-- Thomas Jefferson
  #27  
Old June 30th 18, 07:14 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default Bacteria in spaeships

Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.

For what reason? Sensitive instruments?

Because you don't want things growing on your expensive satellite
that you can't get up to clean.


Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?


No, because we sterilize the things and build them in clean rooms. On
the other hand, see Russian experience with Mir...


What happened inside that space station?
Yet this isn't an example of a satellite being damaged by bacteria.

  #28  
Old June 30th 18, 10:47 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,663
Default Bacteria in spaeships

William Elliot wrote on Fri, 29 Jun 2018 23:14:27
-0700:

Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.

For what reason? Sensitive instruments?

Because you don't want things growing on your expensive satellite
that you can't get up to clean.

Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?


No, because we sterilize the things and build them in clean rooms. On
the other hand, see Russian experience with Mir...


What happened inside that space station?
Yet this isn't an example of a satellite being damaged by bacteria.


But not one of ours and we generally don't refer to things like that
as 'satellites'. They're 'space stations'.


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
  #29  
Old July 1st 18, 05:54 AM posted to sci.space.policy
William Elliot[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 50
Default Bacteria in spaeships

Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.

Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?

No, because we sterilize the things and build them in clean
rooms. On the other hand, see Russian experience with Mir...


What happened inside that space station?
Yet this isn't an example of a satellite being damaged by bacteria.


But not one of ours and we generally don't refer to things like that
as 'satellites'. They're 'space stations'.


What malfunction happened inside the Mir space station that was caused
by bacteria? With all those people aboard the ISS, is it a constant
hassle to keep the place sterilized?

I suppose the Gemini capsules weren't used long enough for bacteria to
become a problem.

Were there any events when an unmanned satellite was damaged by
bacteria?
  #30  
Old July 1st 18, 01:01 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,663
Default Bacteria in spaeships

William Elliot wrote on Sat, 30 Jun 2018 21:54:38
-0700:

Do they also sterilize satellites?
Actually, yes. And build them in 'clean rooms'.

Has it ever happened that an instrument was deteriorated by bacteria?

No, because we sterilize the things and build them in clean
rooms. On the other hand, see Russian experience with Mir...

What happened inside that space station?
Yet this isn't an example of a satellite being damaged by bacteria.


But not one of ours and we generally don't refer to things like that
as 'satellites'. They're 'space stations'.


What malfunction happened inside the Mir space station that was caused
by bacteria? With all those people aboard the ISS, is it a constant
hassle to keep the place sterilized?


Not just bacteria. Mold and all other manner of growing ****e.


I suppose the Gemini capsules weren't used long enough for bacteria to
become a problem.

Were there any events when an unmanned satellite was damaged by
bacteria?


Asked and answered. Which part of "no, because we sterilize them" was
it that left you confused?


--
"Some people get lost in thought because it's such unfamiliar
territory."
--G. Behn
 




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