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For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon



 
 
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  #1  
Old March 25th 11, 01:55 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Sam Wormley[_2_]
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Posts: 3,966
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon
http://www.harvard.edu/webscope/acti.../pdfs/moon.pdf
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  #2  
Old March 26th 11, 01:28 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Ben[_2_]
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Posts: 181
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 25, 6:55*am, Sam Wormley wrote:
For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. (twice)
  #3  
Old March 26th 11, 01:31 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
palsing[_2_]
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Posts: 2,834
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 25, 6:28*pm, Ben wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55*am, Sam Wormley wrote:

For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. *(twice)


Me too...
  #4  
Old March 26th 11, 01:59 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Sam Wormley[_2_]
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Posts: 3,966
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible ShrinkingMoon

On 3/25/11 8:31 PM, palsing wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:28 pm, wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55 am, Sam wrote:

For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. (twice)


Me too...


Well this works... Sorry about that!
-Sam

http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...pnvWhF9GjHszMg


  #5  
Old March 26th 11, 06:17 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
oriel36[_2_]
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Posts: 8,478
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 26, 2:59*am, Sam Wormley wrote:
On 3/25/11 8:31 PM, palsing wrote:

On Mar 25, 6:28 pm, *wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55 am, Sam *wrote:


For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. *(twice)


Me too...


Well this works... Sorry about that!
-Sam







http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...QFjAI&url=http...


"Here’s a real brain-teaser that will test your ability to visualize
motion: When seen from a spot on the Moon, does the Earth rise
slowly, quickly, or not at all? Recall that the Earth spins on its
axis once a day;the Moon spins on its axis once every 27 days
(roughly);and the Moon revolves around the Earth in exactly the same
time—once every 27 days (roughly).It helps if you and a friend build a
model of the Earth-Moon system and try moving the Earth and
Moon.What does each of you see as you move?"

http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/webscope/.../pdfs/moon.pdf

So this is supposed to be one of the premier empirical institutions on
the planet and they firmly believe that the moon has traits of
intrinsic rotation which amounts to variations in latitudinal speeds
from equatorial to polar coordinates.That is no a brain-teaser,that is
merely aping Newton who was the only one to announce the moon rotates
and if that powdered wig said it rotates then his followers can't
imagine any different -

http://books.google.ie/books?id=gB2-...page&q&f=false

You unfortunate people,truly !
  #6  
Old March 26th 11, 12:35 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Mike Collins[_4_]
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Posts: 2,824
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 26, 6:17*am, oriel36 wrote:
On Mar 26, 2:59*am, Sam Wormley wrote:





On 3/25/11 8:31 PM, palsing wrote:


On Mar 25, 6:28 pm, *wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55 am, Sam *wrote:


For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. *(twice)


Me too...


Well this works... Sorry about that!
-Sam


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...QFjAI&url=http...


"Here’s a real brain-teaser that will test your ability to visualize
motion: When seen from a spot *on the Moon, does the *Earth rise
slowly, quickly, or not at all? Recall that the Earth spins on its
axis once a day;the *Moon spins on its axis once every 27 days
(roughly);and the Moon revolves around the Earth in exactly the same
time—once every 27 days (roughly).It helps if you and a friend build a
model of the Earth-Moon system and *try *moving *the *Earth *and
Moon.What does each of you see as you move?"

http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/webscope/.../pdfs/moon.pdf

So this is supposed to be one of the premier empirical institutions on
the planet and they firmly believe that the moon has traits of
intrinsic rotation which amounts to variations in latitudinal speeds
from equatorial to polar coordinates.That is no a brain-teaser,that is
merely aping Newton who was the only one to announce the moon rotates
and if that powdered wig said it rotates then his followers can't
imagine any different -

http://books.google.ie/books?id=gB2-...q=newton+moon+...

You unfortunate people,truly !

How about the statement that you can see up to 70 percent of the
Moon's surface from Earth. A statement you can easily verify for
yourself using the technology of Galileo (a small telescope).
You have yet to come up with an explanation for libration in hour
fanciful universe. Without exposing this effect you will have to admit
you are wrong about lunar rotation.
If you ignore this reply or just waffle you will be shown to be a
doublethinker or fraud.

  #7  
Old March 26th 11, 04:11 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
oriel36[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 8,478
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 26, 1:35*pm, Mike Collins wrote:
On Mar 26, 6:17*am, oriel36 wrote:







On Mar 26, 2:59*am, Sam Wormley wrote:


On 3/25/11 8:31 PM, palsing wrote:


On Mar 25, 6:28 pm, *wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55 am, Sam *wrote:


For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. *(twice)


Me too...


Well this works... Sorry about that!
-Sam


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...QFjAI&url=http...


"Here’s a real brain-teaser that will test your ability to visualize
motion: When seen from a spot *on the Moon, does the *Earth rise
slowly, quickly, or not at all? Recall that the Earth spins on its
axis once a day;the *Moon spins on its axis once every 27 days
(roughly);and the Moon revolves around the Earth in exactly the same
time—once every 27 days (roughly).It helps if you and a friend build a
model of the Earth-Moon system and *try *moving *the *Earth *and
Moon.What does each of you see as you move?"


http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/webscope/.../pdfs/moon.pdf


So this is supposed to be one of the premier empirical institutions on
the planet and they firmly believe that the moon has traits of
intrinsic rotation which amounts to variations in latitudinal speeds
from equatorial to polar coordinates.That is no a brain-teaser,that is
merely aping Newton who was the only one to announce the moon rotates
and if that powdered wig said it rotates then his followers can't
imagine any different -


http://books.google.ie/books?id=gB2-...q=newton+moon+...


You unfortunate people,truly !


How about the statement that you can see up to 70 percent of the
Moon's surface from Earth. A statement you can easily verify for
yourself using the technology of Galileo (a small telescope).


You look out at the moon orbiting the Earth,note the phases as the
moon occupies different orbital positions between the Sun and the
Earth with the Earth as center of the lunar cycle and draw the only
possible conclusion.Use an imitation analogy of lunar orbital motion
will get you there also but effectively it is childsplay.




You have yet to come up with an explanation for libration in hour
fanciful universe. Without exposing this effect you will have to admit
you are wrong about lunar rotation.


Without acknowledging the orbital turning of the Earth to the central
Sun where the orbital daylight/darkness cycle is coincident with the
orbital period of the Earth you can forget about lunar libration,I
have a fair idea of what causes that phenomena but these are fine
points whereas the orbital behavior of the moon is crucial for
understanding the difference with the orbital behavior of a planet.



If you ignore this reply or just waffle you will be shown to be a
doublethinker or fraud.


Don't you ever address me again.



  #8  
Old March 26th 11, 09:28 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Mike Collins[_4_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,824
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

On Mar 26, 4:11*pm, oriel36 wrote:
On Mar 26, 1:35*pm, Mike Collins wrote:





On Mar 26, 6:17*am, oriel36 wrote:


On Mar 26, 2:59*am, Sam Wormley wrote:


On 3/25/11 8:31 PM, palsing wrote:


On Mar 25, 6:28 pm, *wrote:
On Mar 25, 6:55 am, Sam *wrote:


For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moonhttp://www.harvard.edu/webscope/activities/pdfs/moon.pdf


I got a 404, Sam. *(twice)


Me too...


Well this works... Sorry about that!
-Sam


http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&sourc...QFjAI&url=http...


"Here’s a real brain-teaser that will test your ability to visualize
motion: When seen from a spot *on the Moon, does the *Earth rise
slowly, quickly, or not at all? Recall that the Earth spins on its
axis once a day;the *Moon spins on its axis once every 27 days
(roughly);and the Moon revolves around the Earth in exactly the same
time—once every 27 days (roughly).It helps if you and a friend build a
model of the Earth-Moon system and *try *moving *the *Earth *and
Moon.What does each of you see as you move?"


http://www.cfa.harvard.edu/webscope/.../pdfs/moon.pdf


So this is supposed to be one of the premier empirical institutions on
the planet and they firmly believe that the moon has traits of
intrinsic rotation which amounts to variations in latitudinal speeds
from equatorial to polar coordinates.That is no a brain-teaser,that is
merely aping Newton who was the only one to announce the moon rotates
and if that powdered wig said it rotates then his followers can't
imagine any different -


http://books.google.ie/books?id=gB2-...q=newton+moon+...


You unfortunate people,truly !


How about the statement that you can see up to 70 percent of the
Moon's surface from Earth. A statement you can easily verify for
yourself using the technology of Galileo (a small telescope).


You look out at the moon orbiting the Earth,note the phases as the
moon occupies different orbital positions between the Sun and the
Earth with the Earth as center of the lunar cycle and draw the only
possible conclusion.Use an imitation analogy of lunar orbital motion
will get you there also but effectively it is childsplay.

You have yet to come up with an explanation for libration in hour
fanciful universe. Without exposing this effect you will have to admit
you are wrong about lunar rotation.


Without acknowledging the orbital turning of the Earth to the central
Sun where the orbital daylight/darkness cycle is coincident with the
orbital period of the Earth you can forget about lunar libration,I
have a fair idea of what causes that phenomena but these are fine
points whereas the orbital behavior of the moon is crucial for
understanding the difference with the orbital behavior of a planet.

If you ignore this reply or just waffle you will be shown to be a
doublethinker or fraud.


Don't you ever address me again.- Hide quoted text -

- Show quoted text -


So you have no explanation for the phenomenon of libration.

You just waffled then said you have a fair idea of the cause of
libration.
Tell us about this fair idea.
Or you will be admitting you are a doublethinker or a fraud.
  #9  
Old March 27th 11, 10:02 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Dr J R Stockton[_106_]
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Posts: 1
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon

In sci.astro.amateur message [email protected]
000yqe.googlegroups.com, Sat, 26 Mar 2011 05:35:19, Mike Collins
posted:

How about the statement that you can see up to 70 percent of the
Moon's surface from Earth. A statement you can easily verify for
yourself using the technology of Galileo (a small telescope).


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon : "Libration also changes the angle
from which the Moon is seen, allowing about 59% of its surface to be
seen from the Earth".

I don't know whether that figure, dominantly at least due to apparent
"side to side" motion caused by eccentricity, includes the apparent
"nodding" motion due to tilts, or the extra half a degree all round due
to parallax and the size of the Earth.

--
(c) John Stockton, nr London, UK. Turnpike v6.05 MIME.
Web http://www.merlyn.demon.co.uk/ - FAQqish topics, acronyms and links;
Astro stuff via astron-1.htm, gravity0.htm ; quotings.htm, pascal.htm, etc.
No Encoding. Quotes before replies. Snip well. Write clearly. Don't Mail News.
  #10  
Old March 28th 11, 11:02 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur,sci.physics
Ben[_2_]
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Posts: 181
Default For Kids and Grownups -- Exploration3: the Incredible Shrinking Moon


http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moon : "Libration also changes the angle
from which the Moon is seen, allowing about 59% of its surface to be
seen from the Earth".

I don't know whether that figure, dominantly at least due to apparent
"side to side" motion caused by eccentricity, includes the apparent
"nodding" motion due to tilts, or the extra half a degree all round due
to parallax and the size of the Earth.


There are three classes of libration, optical, physical and
topocentric. Jean Meuss in 'Astronomical Algorithms'
states:
However, apparent oscillations known as *optical librations*
which are due
to variations in the geometric position of the
Earth.......allow about 59%
of the surface to be observed from the Earth. (p.371)

He goes on to say that *physical libration* can never be larger than
0.04 degree in both latitude and longitude.
Well that's not very much and would be observable only under the most
rigorous conditions.

But concerning *topocentric librations* he states that the geocentric
values of the librations and the position angle
of axis should be reduced to the values at the place of the observer
on the surface of the Earth. "For the librations
the values may reach 1 degree and have important effects on limb
contour."

So by shifting one's position around the Earth, say from Hudson Bay to
Tierra del Fuego one could see perhaps
60% of the Moon's surface? I don't know. I've always held the 59%
factor as an adequate estimate.

 




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