A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Space Science » Policy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old March 16th 04, 06:45 PM
TKalbfus
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

I find it interesting that Sedna was discovered near its closest point in its
10,500 year orbit around the Sun. What are the chances of that happening? If
you only consider the planet Sedna, the chances of discovering it while it is
near is closest point to the Sun are very small. Sedna spends most of its time
further away, this leads to the question how many other "Sedna's" are there?
What if we looked for a 10th planet 1000 years ago with the same technology we
have today? Would we find another Sedna-like planet nearing its closest point
to the sun. Sedna will spend 150 closer to the Sun than from where we
discovered it. statistically this leaves room for about 60 planets in 10,000
year orbits around the sun. all those planets are potential colonies for future
colonists. The ones further away will be harder to find, but I'm sure we can
eventually discover them.
  #2  
Old March 16th 04, 10:14 PM
Jon Leech
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

In article ,
TKalbfus wrote:
I find it interesting that Sedna was discovered near its closest point in its
10,500 year orbit around the Sun. What are the chances of that happening?


High. Think about what happens to its brightness and motion across
the sky as it moves further out.

you only consider the planet Sedna, the chances of discovering it while it is
near is closest point to the Sun are very small. Sedna spends most of its time
further away, this leads to the question how many other "Sedna's" are there?


Likely a lot more than 60.

Jon
__@/
  #5  
Old March 17th 04, 03:34 AM
Joe Strout
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

In article ,
"jacob navia" wrote:

"Hobbs aka McDaniel" a écrit dans le message de
om...
(TKalbfus) wrote in message

...

We haven't even colonized the moon outside of sci-fi so it's a bit
premature to view Sedna as some kind of development property


Besides, who would like to live in perpetual
darkness?


People with a mastery of artificial lighting, I suppose.

I mean from there the sun is just a slightly brighter
star.


So? Where I am at the moment, the Sun isn't even as bright as a visible
star; in fact it's clear around on the other side of a rather large
rocky planet. Yet I still manage to waste time in Usenet.

Probably we will make homes in space, and I bet most of
the construction industry will be space based by the end
of this century. All around the earth orbit there is a lot
of real-estate. Millions of cubic Km of place where we
can grow plants, and live from the food that we grow from
the sun.


All true, but you can grow food perfectly well under artificial lights
too. (Even if we assume that people colonizing the Kuiper belt still
have need of food, which seems unlikely.)

Weather is exactly like the earth since the
orbit is more or less the same.


Weather in a space colony has nothing to do with its orbit.

But there?

In perpetual darkness forever?

Doesn't look like a very exciting place to build a home.


Well, don't then. There are billions of people already, with wildly
varying opinions on things. I, for example, would be perfectly content
there, given a secure supply of energy and raw materials (and technology
sufficiently advanced to make use of it).

Best,
- Joe

,------------------------------------------------------------------.
| Joseph J. Strout Check out the Mac Web Directory: |
|
http://www.macwebdir.com |
`------------------------------------------------------------------'
  #6  
Old March 17th 04, 04:36 AM
ARNOLDEVNS
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

We haven't even colonized the moon outside of sci-fi so it's a bit
premature to view Sedna as some kind of development property
Probably will be visited by robot probes within 30 years.


I'd bet it's sooner than that. The New Horizons mission that's scheduled to
blast off for Pluto in 2006 is also designed to visit Kuiper belt objects.
Depending on where Sedna is, it would seem like this would be a logical next
stop on this long mission.
  #7  
Old March 17th 04, 09:16 AM
William Elliot
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

On Tue, 17 Mar 2004, ARNOLDEVNS wrote:

We haven't even colonized the moon outside of sci-fi so it's a bit
premature to view Sedna as some kind of development property
Probably will be visited by robot probes within 30 years.


I'd bet it's sooner than that. The New Horizons mission that's scheduled to
blast off for Pluto in 2006 is also designed to visit Kuiper belt objects.
Depending on where Sedna is, it would seem like this would be a logical next
stop on this long mission.

No way, according to James Osberg,
Sedna and Pluto are in opposition,
ie opposite sides of the solar system.
  #8  
Old March 17th 04, 12:53 PM
Tamas Feher
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?

all those planets are potential colonies for future colonists.

No planet or other celestial body is inhabitable by homo sapiens sapiens,
unless it has gravity between 80% to 120% of Earth. Gravity is the most
fundamental force in the Universe and lack of enough gravity (less than
0.8G) depletes your bones and muscles, prevents successful reproduction and
fetus formation. To much and you are flat.

I don't get all the fuss about travel to Mars and Moon, casue what we need
is another Earth. Great pity Venus is in the wrong place, it would be ideal.


  #9  
Old March 17th 04, 02:36 PM
Greg D. Moore \(Strider\)
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?


"Tamas Feher" wrote in message
...
all those planets are potential colonies for future colonists.


No planet or other celestial body is inhabitable by homo sapiens sapiens,
unless it has gravity between 80% to 120% of Earth. Gravity is the most
fundamental force in the Universe and lack of enough gravity (less than
0.8G) depletes your bones and muscles, prevents successful reproduction

and
fetus formation. To much and you are flat.


And where exactly did you come up with those numbers?

The fact of the matter is we don't know for sure. We simply know that 1G is
good, 0G is not so great, and know nothing about in between.

It may be .6 G is enough... maybe not.



I don't get all the fuss about travel to Mars and Moon, casue what we need
is another Earth. Great pity Venus is in the wrong place, it would be

ideal.




  #10  
Old March 17th 04, 04:50 PM
Uddo Graaf
external usenet poster
 
Posts: n/a
Default Sedna, space probes?, colonies? what's next?


"TKalbfus" wrote in message
...
I find it interesting that Sedna was discovered near its closest point in

its
10,500 year orbit around the Sun. What are the chances of that happening?

If
you only consider the planet Sedna, the chances of discovering it while it

is
near is closest point to the Sun are very small. Sedna spends most of its

time
further away, this leads to the question how many other "Sedna's" are

there?
What if we looked for a 10th planet 1000 years ago with the same

technology we
have today? Would we find another Sedna-like planet nearing its closest

point
to the sun. Sedna will spend 150 closer to the Sun than from where we
discovered it. statistically this leaves room for about 60 planets in

10,000
year orbits around the sun. all those planets are potential colonies for

future
colonists. The ones further away will be harder to find, but I'm sure we

can
eventually discover them.


Colonies that far away from the Sun? Unlikely. Mankind can multiply like
rabbits and it would still take at least 300 years to fill up the inner
planets and moons. Sedna or its denizen's aren't likely candidates for
colonization and when they are, mankind will probably have developed FTL
(faster than light) propulsion and reach for planets beyond our solar
system.


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
National Space Policy: NSDD-42 (issued on July 4th, 1982) Stuf4 Space Shuttle 150 July 28th 04 07:30 AM
European high technology for the International Space Station Jacques van Oene Space Station 0 May 10th 04 02:40 PM
Clueless pundits (was High-flight rate Medium vs. New Heavy lift launchers) Rand Simberg Space Science Misc 18 February 14th 04 04:28 AM
Moon key to space future? James White Policy 90 January 6th 04 05:29 PM
International Space Station Science - One of NASA's rising stars Jacques van Oene Space Station 0 December 27th 03 02:32 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:49 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2024, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2024 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.