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No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far



 
 
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  #21  
Old January 20th 20, 12:12 AM posted to alt.astronomy
palsing[_2_]
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Posts: 3,043
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far

On Sunday, January 19, 2020 at 10:55:31 AM UTC-8, wrote:

I am quite sure I understand "scientific method" far better than you.

Over the years, I've created a treasure trove of useful and interesting apps.

Certainly like me there are many who don't believe in BHs and consider them essentially theoretical.

To each his own ...


In other words, you have zero evidence to support your claim. This comes as no surprise at all.

And no, it is clear that you don't understand the scientific method at all.... it is all about the evidence...

sci·en·tif·ic meth·od
noun
a method of procedure that has characterized natural science since the 17th century, consisting in systematic observation, measurement, and experiment, and the formulation, testing, and modification of hypotheses.
"criticism is the backbone of the scientific method"
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  #22  
Old January 20th 20, 12:20 AM posted to alt.astronomy
[email protected]
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Posts: 476
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far

I=20see=20no=20use=20in=20discussing=20this=20furt her=20with=20som=
eone=20like=20you,=20who=20is=20obviously=20out=20 of=20touch=20wit=
h=20reality.=20If=20you=20want=20the=20last=20word ,=20you're=20wel=
come=20to=20it,=20but=20you=20should=20really=20tr y=20to=20make=20=
sense=20for=20a=20change.


  #23  
Old January 20th 20, 12:43 AM posted to alt.astronomy
palsing[_2_]
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Posts: 3,043
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far

On Sunday, January 19, 2020 at 4:20:39 PM UTC-8, wrote:

I see no use in discussing this further with someone like you, who is obviously out of touch with reality. If you want the last word, you're welcome to it, but you should really try to make sense for a change.


I'm out of touch with reality? I provide links that show that black holes almost certainly exist. I can provide literally hundreds of links that make the same claim, including many observations and experiments. You, on the other hand, claim that black holes do not exist, but rather are just "theoretical", without a lick of evidence to support your position.

I'm afraid that it is *you* who is out of touch with reality. You obviously have a closed mind and just cannot stand the thought of being challenged when making claims that you cannot support.

I suggest that you either provide evidence to support your claims or quit making them altogether.

Have a great evening...
  #24  
Old June 10th 20, 01:49 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Porcospino
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Posts: 7
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far


On 2020-01-05, casagiannoni optonline.net wrote:
Not surprizing, even considering that intelligent apace faring species must
abound throughout the universe, considering the vast interstellar distances.
Even at near light speed, which is extreemly unlikely, travel times would be
prohibitively long.


Would they really be 'prohibitively' long, however? We know that
propulsion systems capable of reaching the nearest stars within a human
lifetime are possible (e.g., nuclear pulse as in Project Orion, or laser
sails). Given the age of the universe there may be civilizations
who have existed for billions of years: even travelling at a fraction of
the speed of light that's more than enough for a civilization to cross the
Milky Way several times, albeit at a slow pace and over many generations.

Nothing in physics or engineering prevents it, more so for a spacefaring
civilizations which, you'd assume, can command enough energy to do this
at little relative expense (without any breakthrough in physics). Time
and propulsion systems are no obstacle, unless you believe that a
closed-cycle life support system capable of working for centuries is
impossible (not just from the perspective of present human technology
but for everyone in all circumstances), or that no living being can
adapt to prolonged life in space (even within envisioned settlements
such as O'Neil cylinders) and thus cannot be away from a planetary
surface for more than a few years.

Setting aside the 'UFO' question, towards which I'm a skeptic, I think
it's easier to explain the Fermi paradox in terms of not having observed
long enough. We have not been around (or been paying attention) long enough
to claim that no intelligent species capable of interstellar travel /ever/
existed.
  #25  
Old June 11th 20, 01:57 AM posted to alt.astronomy
Andrew W[_2_]
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Posts: 13
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far

casagiannoni wrote in message ...

Not surprizing, even considering that intelligent apace faring species must
abound throughout the universe, considering the vast interstellar
distances. Even at near light speed, which is extreemly unlikely, travel
times would be prohibitively long.

Perhaps this is very fortunate since a more advanced species might expoit
manking as a resource, just like we do here.


Confirmed by who? You obviously haven't done much research on this subject.
The corrupt mainstream media and governminds are never going to confirm
anything on this subject.


--
http://members.optusnet.com.au/ajwerner/

The golden rule with food - if it smells strange from the fridge then throw
it in the bin. With Christianity, if it sounds strange and it's from the
Bible then you must embrace it as the word of God.

A question to all Christians: Was the Bible inspired or dictated? Because if
it was just inspired then it can't be called God's word.

http://www.rumormillnews.com -- The best alternative news site.

  #26  
Old June 11th 20, 02:39 PM posted to alt.astronomy
[email protected]
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Posts: 476
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far - perhaps long lived


=20
=20=20Nothing=20in=20physics=20or=20engineering= 20prevents=20it,=

=20more=20so=20for=20a=20spacefaring
=20=20civilizations=20which,=20you'd=20assume,=2 0can=20command=

=20enough=20energy=20to=20do=20this
=20=20at=20little=20relative=20expense=20(withou t=20any=20breakt=

hrough=20in=20physics).


As=20i've=20stated,=20even=20at=20near=20light=20s peed,=20which=20=
is=20extreemly=20unlikely,=20travel=20times=20woul d=20be
prohibitively=20long.

Do=20the=20simple=20math.=20=20Distance=20=3d=20Sp eed=20x=20Time=
=20=20!


  #27  
Old June 12th 20, 01:37 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Porcospino
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Posts: 7
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far - perhaps long lived

On 2020-06-11, casagiannoni optonline.net wrote:


Nothing in physics or engineering prevents it, more so for a spacefaring
civilizations which, you'd assume, can command enough energy to do this
at little relative expense (without any breakthrough in physics).



As i've stated, even at near light speed, which is extreemly unlikely, travel
times would be prohibitively long.

Do the simple math. Distance = Speed x Time !


It might be prohibitively long for an individual, but it doesn't have to
be for a /species/. With a laser sail design that's reasonable from the
point of view of a 'spacefaring' civilization (with settlements in its
own star system, an industrial presence, etc.) you could perhaps reach
Alpha Centauri within thirty years, and your civilization could slowly
hop from one nearby star to the next. At ~0.15c crossing the Galaxy
would take a bit more than one million years. Even if you assume that
these hops only happen once every century, that's 100 million years.

This might seem 'prohibitively long' to you, but there are stars that
have existed for /billions/ of years, and it's possible that
technological civilizations could be just as long-lived (jellyfish have
existed on Earth for half a billion years - I'm confident that an
intelligent species might do the same, especially if space colonization
enables it to overcome the limitations of its environment).

As a last point, you allowed for "near light speed". While that's
physically possible I'm less confident it would feasible from an
engineering point of view, even for an advanced spacefaring species. But
since you brought it up, I'll mention this.
The 'opposite side' of the galaxy, 200k light years away, would take at
least 200k years to reach in a single trip (the simple math that you
love). That, of course, is well beyond the endurance of any known living
being (and presumably of any automated ship you could build). However
you forgot about relativistic time dilation: even if we assume that the
craft has to slowly accelerate at 1 g until it reaches its peak speed,
and then has to decelerate until its destination, from the frame of
reference of its crew the whole trip would take less than 25 years.
Even if there's no going back and it's an absurd proposition (since a
slow expansion makes a lot more sense than cutting all ties with your
home planet and choosing to settle a star on the other side of the
galaxy), it shows that travel time is no obstacle.
  #28  
Old June 12th 20, 02:04 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Sjouke Burry[_2_]
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Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far - perhaps long lived

On 12.06.20 14:37, Porcospino wrote:
On 2020-06-11, casagiannoni optonline.net wrote:


Nothing in physics or engineering prevents it, more so for a spacefaring
civilizations which, you'd assume, can command enough energy to do this
at little relative expense (without any breakthrough in physics).



As i've stated, even at near light speed, which is extreemly unlikely, travel
times would be prohibitively long.

Do the simple math. Distance = Speed x Time !


It might be prohibitively long for an individual, but it doesn't have to
be for a /species/. With a laser sail design that's reasonable from the
point of view of a 'spacefaring' civilization (with settlements in its
own star system, an industrial presence, etc.) you could perhaps reach
Alpha Centauri within thirty years, and your civilization could slowly
hop from one nearby star to the next. At ~0.15c crossing the Galaxy
would take a bit more than one million years. Even if you assume that
these hops only happen once every century, that's 100 million years.

This might seem 'prohibitively long' to you, but there are stars that
have existed for /billions/ of years, and it's possible that
technological civilizations could be just as long-lived (jellyfish have
existed on Earth for half a billion years - I'm confident that an
intelligent species might do the same, especially if space colonization
enables it to overcome the limitations of its environment).

As a last point, you allowed for "near light speed". While that's
physically possible I'm less confident it would feasible from an
engineering point of view, even for an advanced spacefaring species. But
since you brought it up, I'll mention this.
The 'opposite side' of the galaxy, 200k light years away, would take at
least 200k years to reach in a single trip (the simple math that you
love). That, of course, is well beyond the endurance of any known living
being (and presumably of any automated ship you could build). However
you forgot about relativistic time dilation: even if we assume that the
craft has to slowly accelerate at 1 g until it reaches its peak speed,
and then has to decelerate until its destination, from the frame of
reference of its crew the whole trip would take less than 25 years.
Even if there's no going back and it's an absurd proposition (since a
slow expansion makes a lot more sense than cutting all ties with your
home planet and choosing to settle a star on the other side of the
galaxy), it shows that travel time is no obstacle.

At any reasonable speed, you will be barbecued slowly by alfa, beta and
gamma
radiation.
I dont think living beings can survive.
One SF book I read, used self-replicating space probes.
When they passed a star system, they started mining, and produced
replica-probes, sending those in all directions.
That grows exponentially, and after a few millennia, their corner of the
galaxy
was covered with probes.
If they detected life, send back probes loaded with that info.
For a longe-lived species, that works, and you dont have to leave home.
  #29  
Old June 15th 20, 09:07 PM posted to alt.astronomy
Porcospino
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Posts: 7
Default No Confirmed UFOs Ever So Far - perhaps long lived

On 2020-06-12, Sjouke Burry wrote:
At any reasonable speed, you will be barbecued slowly by alfa, beta and
gamma
radiation.
I dont think living beings can survive.


Maybe. We actually don't know a whole lot about long-term, low-level
exposure to radiation, how the body responds it and whether there are
possible solutions: there is some research about drugs that could
mitigate the effects of radiation; galactic cosmic rays (which are for
the most part protons and alpha particles) could be shielded against
with hydrogen-rich materials like plastics or by surrounding habitats
with regolith mined from asteroids; etc.

So we don't really know if it's a massive problem in the first place
and, in case it is, whether mitigation is impossible. But of course it
will be one of the challenges of interstellar travel.

One SF book I read, used self-replicating space probes.
When they passed a star system, they started mining, and produced
replica-probes, sending those in all directions.
That grows exponentially, and after a few millennia, their corner of the
galaxy
was covered with probes.
If they detected life, send back probes loaded with that info.
For a longe-lived species, that works, and you dont have to leave home.


Agree that that's a possible solution (although there could be benefits
to colonization 'in person'). Even if radiation isn't a showstopper
imagining a a life support system that can operate without any
external input for decades might be really challenging.
 




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