A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Astronomy and Astrophysics » Amateur Astronomy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Looking into the past with a telescope



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #1  
Old January 25th 07, 05:33 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
cantseeboo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Looking into the past with a telescope

With the JWT, I have read that scientist will be able to see back
closer to the big bang than with any modern telescope; targeting IR.

I understand that when we look at a DSO (or any object), that we are
looking at the DSO the way it looked at some time(t) in the past. In
this respect, we are looking at a snap shot of the past.

But what exactly are the astronomers expecting to see? New galaxies
not seen before due to their extreme red shift?

  #2  
Old January 26th 07, 03:34 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
canopus56[_1_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 556
Default Looking into the past with a telescope

cantseeboo wrote:
With the JWT, I have read that scientist will be able to see back
closer to the big bang . . . . But what exactly are the astronomers
expecting to see? New galaxies not seen before due to their
extreme red shift?


The formation of the first galaxies. - Canopus56

  #3  
Old January 26th 07, 03:17 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
cantseeboo
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 28
Default Looking into the past with a telescope



The formation of the first galaxies. - Canopus56


1) Do the astronomers have an idea of where to look, or, are they just
going to perform random scanning of the sky?

  #4  
Old January 26th 07, 03:26 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Greg Crinklaw
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 886
Default Looking into the past with a telescope

cantseeboo wrote:

The formation of the first galaxies. - Canopus56


1) Do the astronomers have an idea of where to look, or, are they just
going to perform random scanning of the sky?


They surround us. But it would be a good idea to look somewhere there
is little between us and those great distances. A window, of sorts,
presumably away from Milky Way and large intervening clusters of galaxies.

--
Greg Crinklaw
Astronomical Software Developer
Cloudcroft, New Mexico, USA (33N, 106W, 2700m)

SkyTools: http://www.skyhound.com/cs.html
Observing: http://www.skyhound.com/sh/skyhound.html
Comets: http://www.skyhound.com/sh/comets.html

To reply take out your eye
  #5  
Old January 26th 07, 05:05 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
oriel36
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,189
Default Looking into the past with a telescope



On Jan 25, 5:33 pm, "cantseeboo" wrote:
With the JWT, I have read that scientist will be able to see back
closer to the big bang than with any modern telescope; targeting IR.

I understand that when we look at a DSO (or any object), that we are
looking at the DSO the way it looked at some time(t) in the past. In
this respect, we are looking at a snap shot of the past.

But what exactly are the astronomers expecting to see? New galaxies
not seen before due to their extreme red shift?


Would you like to be the first to answer this question correctly.

You know that our solar system is moving with the rest of the local
stars around the Milky Way axis.

If you look at an external galaxy,say the Whirlpool galaxy,what would
you expect to happen after 1 million years ?.Remember the foreground
stars of the Milky Way are orbiting the galactic axis therefore we are
moving like a system on a giant carousel.

The idea is to develop the feel for cyclical motions and how to use the
illusion created by radiation having a finite speed just like Ole
Roemer used the orbital cycles of the Earth and Jupiter to determine
that light generates an illusion as we look into the celestial arena
where all the great cycles exist.

  #6  
Old January 26th 07, 05:20 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Starboard
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 126
Default Looking into the past with a telescope

Would you like to be the first to answer this question correctly.

You know that our solar system is moving with the rest of the local
stars around the Milky Way axis.


If you look at an external galaxy,say the Whirlpool galaxy,what would
you expect to happen after 1 million years ?.Remember the foreground
stars of the Milky Way are orbiting the galactic axis therefore we are
moving like a system on a giant carousel.


That seems true for indicating the direction to intergalaxy objects
with respect to intragalaxy objects, but is that true for indicating
direction of intergalaxy objects with respect to other intergalaxy
objects?

Don't listen to me, I'm tired as old hell from staying up late putting
together the NEW XT-12 Intelliscope.... Yeee doggie!

Errol
pasnola

Errol
pasnola

  #7  
Old January 27th 07, 11:58 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
oriel36
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,189
Default Looking into the past with a telescope


Starboard wrote:
Would you like to be the first to answer this question correctly.


You know that our solar system is moving with the rest of the local
stars around the Milky Way axis.


If you look at an external galaxy,say the Whirlpool galaxy,what would
you expect to happen after 1 million years ?.Remember the foreground
stars of the Milky Way are orbiting the galactic axis therefore we are
moving like a system on a giant carousel.


That seems true for indicating the direction to intergalaxy objects
with respect to intragalaxy objects, but is that true for indicating
direction of intergalaxy objects with respect to other intergalaxy
objects?


The motion of the local forground Milky Way stars ,including the
motion of our system,will cause the the position of the external
galaxies to change just as you would see external objects to change
their position against other objects on a carousel.

Of course you use constellational geometry to describe the position of
the external galaxies -

http://www.opencourse.info/astronomy...ion_stars_sun/
celestial_sphere_anim.gif

Where there should be an exciting astronomical attempt to show how the
foreground stars change by using the external positions of the
galaxies there is nothing.There are plent of guys looking for 'dark'
things and all the other kitch of celestial sphere concepts but none
given towards using actual celestial objects and their known motions.

There is an added complication based on supernova data and how the
effect Ole Romer noticed at the heliocentric level becomes enormous at
the level of galactic orbital motion and the position of the external
galaxies.Considering I have yet to receive an affirmation of how we
see our own heliocentric motion in a forum which cheerfully promotes
any recognition of astronomical centers,well....



Don't listen to me, I'm tired as old hell from staying up late putting
together the NEW XT-12 Intelliscope.... Yeee doggie!

Errol
pasnola

Errol
pasnola


 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
Saw it go past...... Justa Lurker Space Shuttle 9 December 11th 06 01:47 AM
Keck telescope captures Jupiter's Red Spot Jr. as it zips past planet's Great Red Spot (Forwarded) Andrew Yee News 0 July 31st 06 02:13 AM
Blast from the past Pat Flannery History 9 August 21st 05 01:36 AM
looking to the past Mr Jherek Chamaeleo Misc 4 January 6th 04 05:13 AM
looking into the past??? download the whole internet Science 8 August 30th 03 11:17 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 04:26 PM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2020, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright 2004-2020 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.