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Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue



 
 
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  #1  
Old November 18th 17, 06:27 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Razzmatazz
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Posts: 242
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=
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  #2  
Old November 18th 17, 06:33 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Razzmatazz
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Posts: 242
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 11:27:59 AM UTC-6, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=


Forgot to add that this image was captured thru my 432mm F8 Astrograph using clear, red, green, blue, H-a and OIII filters over a period of 3 nights.

At mag 10.1, this planetary nebula is just visible in 100mm binoculars as a fuzzy patch in Perseus overhead at 10pm local time.

Razzy
  #3  
Old November 18th 17, 07:14 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 885
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 5:27:59 PM UTC, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in


The winter set in about 3 weeks ago. It is defined by the Polar day/night cycle where Polar noon happens on the December Solstice therefore 6 weeks either side of this date reflect the beginning and end of winter, in the Norther hemisphere the beginning is November 1st and the end is February 1st.

https://www.usap.gov/videoclipsandmaps/spwebcam.cfm

Astronomy appeals to the spirit of men or humanity as it connects the individual to the Universal by inspiration (spirit).
  #4  
Old November 19th 17, 05:50 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Michael Asherman[_2_]
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Posts: 5
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

Excellent!

"Razzmatazz" wrote in message
...
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead.
Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a
Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere
shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a
shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=


  #5  
Old November 21st 17, 09:47 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Martin Brown[_3_]
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Posts: 67
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On 18/11/2017 17:33, Razzmatazz wrote:
On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 11:27:59 AM UTC-6, Razzmatazz
wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass
overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star
death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed
its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas)
and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the
surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=



Forgot to add that this image was captured thru my 432mm F8
Astrograph using clear, red, green, blue, H-a and OIII filters over a
period of 3 nights.


It will look a lot closer to natural colours if you render OIII as cyan.

At mag 10.1, this planetary nebula is just visible in 100mm
binoculars as a fuzzy patch in Perseus overhead at 10pm local time.

Razzy



--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #6  
Old November 21st 17, 06:51 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Razzmatazz
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Posts: 242
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Tuesday, November 21, 2017 at 2:47:44 AM UTC-6, Martin Brown wrote:
On 18/11/2017 17:33, Razzmatazz wrote:
On Saturday, November 18, 2017 at 11:27:59 AM UTC-6, Razzmatazz
wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass
overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star
death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed
its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas)
and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the
surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=



Forgot to add that this image was captured thru my 432mm F8
Astrograph using clear, red, green, blue, H-a and OIII filters over a
period of 3 nights.


It will look a lot closer to natural colours if you render OIII as cyan.

At mag 10.1, this planetary nebula is just visible in 100mm
binoculars as a fuzzy patch in Perseus overhead at 10pm local time.

Razzy



--
Regards,
Martin Brown


Thanks, will try that.
However, I just like electric blue personally, so this image is according to my strange taste.

Razzy
  #7  
Old December 5th 17, 06:00 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 731
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:27:59 UTC-5, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=


Which colour for double-ionized oxygen is real? Most shots I've seen, it's been green, but it's blue here.
  #8  
Old December 5th 17, 04:16 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Martin Brown[_3_]
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Posts: 67
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On 05/12/2017 05:00, RichA wrote:
On Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:27:59 UTC-5, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=


Which colour for double-ionized oxygen is real? Most shots I've seen, it's been green, but it's blue here.


OIII to my eyes is just on the dark green side of cyan if bright enough.
With a bit of cunning you can create a plausible looking pseudo colour
image from just OIII 501nm and Ha 656nm narrowband by treating stars and
nebulosity differently in the post processing.

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #9  
Old December 5th 17, 04:31 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Chris L Peterson
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Posts: 9,502
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Tue, 5 Dec 2017 15:16:47 +0000, Martin Brown
wrote:

On 05/12/2017 05:00, RichA wrote:
On Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:27:59 UTC-5, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=


Which colour for double-ionized oxygen is real? Most shots I've seen, it's been green, but it's blue here.


OIII to my eyes is just on the dark green side of cyan if bright enough.
With a bit of cunning you can create a plausible looking pseudo colour
image from just OIII 501nm and Ha 656nm narrowband by treating stars and
nebulosity differently in the post processing.


The problem is, color isn't a physical thing, but physiological. We
don't perceive color in terms of wavelength, but in terms of a
function of both wavelength and intensity.

Take a 501 nm source and adjust its intensity and people will see
colors ranging from greenish-black to greenish-white. That is, people
will identify several hundred colors by simply changing the intensity.

That's why it's pretty pointless to worry about "true" or "accurate"
color in most astronomical images (certainly those containing narrow
band emission sources). How the output of different filter channels is
mapped to the broad red, green, and blue channels of our output
devices really just depends on the intent of the imager: an aesthetic
result, or colors which enhance features of interest.
  #10  
Old December 6th 17, 01:10 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
RichA[_6_]
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Posts: 731
Default Messier 76 - "Spirit of 76" - Red - White - and Blue

On Tuesday, 5 December 2017 10:31:35 UTC-5, Chris L Peterson wrote:
On Tue, 5 Dec 2017 15:16:47 +0000, Martin Brown
wrote:

On 05/12/2017 05:00, RichA wrote:
On Saturday, 18 November 2017 12:27:59 UTC-5, Razzmatazz wrote:
Just before winter sets in the outer arms of the Milky Way pass overhead. Embedded in them are regions of star formation and star death. M76 is a Planetary Nebula where the central star has shed its outer atmosphere shedding its hydrogen (the bright red areas) and oxygen (blue areas) into a shell, which is expanding into the surrounding space.

https://www.astromart.com/common/ima...7.jpg&caption=

Which colour for double-ionized oxygen is real? Most shots I've seen, it's been green, but it's blue here.


OIII to my eyes is just on the dark green side of cyan if bright enough.
With a bit of cunning you can create a plausible looking pseudo colour
image from just OIII 501nm and Ha 656nm narrowband by treating stars and
nebulosity differently in the post processing.


The problem is, color isn't a physical thing, but physiological. We
don't perceive color in terms of wavelength, but in terms of a
function of both wavelength and intensity.

Take a 501 nm source and adjust its intensity and people will see
colors ranging from greenish-black to greenish-white. That is, people
will identify several hundred colors by simply changing the intensity.

That's why it's pretty pointless to worry about "true" or "accurate"
color in most astronomical images (certainly those containing narrow
band emission sources). How the output of different filter channels is
mapped to the broad red, green, and blue channels of our output
devices really just depends on the intent of the imager: an aesthetic
result, or colors which enhance features of interest.


There are a lot of (mostly men) who can't distinguish between things like certain shades of blue and green, or red and orange. I see people commenting on a colour fairly often where it's clearly not what they think it is.
 




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