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Supernova structure



 
 
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  #1  
Old October 17th 17, 07:56 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Supernova structure

https://www.scientificamerican.com/s...E81BC8B34C6357

Stellar evolution has a specific geometry to it whether as the antecedent supernova star or after the event occurred -

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0701/sn1987a_hst.jpg











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  #2  
Old October 19th 17, 08:22 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Default Supernova structure

Trying to link the great supernova events which were observed long before telescopes came on the scene with hypothetical theoretical junk is perhaps the last act of vandalism by the empiricists and their celestial sphere buddies.

The idea of a transition phase where a supernova creates a solar system rather than the death of a star maintains the integrity of galactic structure but these stellar evolutionary processes then raise a number of interesting points which are not easy to resolve.

  #3  
Old October 19th 17, 11:31 AM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Mike Collins[_4_]
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Default Supernova structure

Gerald Kelleher wrote:
Trying to link the great supernova events which were observed long before
telescopes came on the scene with hypothetical theoretical junk is
perhaps the last act of vandalism by the empiricists and their celestial sphere buddies.

Then why don’t you stop doing it?

The idea of a transition phase where a supernova creates a solar system
rather than the death of a star maintains the integrity of galactic
structure but these stellar evolutionary processes then raise a number of
interesting points which are not easy to resolve.

Hypothetical junk.



  #4  
Old October 19th 17, 12:09 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 889
Default Supernova structure

On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 11:31:10 AM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:

Playing/typing on a keyboard is not a talent so that the poor unfortunate who left a blank response in the other thread is much the same as you are doing now. Life is too short to waste on people who journeyed through life in their heads and played no part in inspiring acts but boy,do they look for attention.

Must be miserable knowing you have nothing left to contribute apart from attaching yourself to my threads as even I don't want it.
  #5  
Old October 19th 17, 01:00 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
[email protected]
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Default Supernova structure

On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 12:09:20 PM UTC+1, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 11:31:10 AM UTC+1, Mike Collins wrote:

Playing/typing on a keyboard is not a talent so that the poor unfortunate who left a blank response in the other thread is much the same as you are doing now. Life is too short to waste on people who journeyed through life in their heads and played no part in inspiring acts but boy,do they look for attention.

Must be miserable knowing you have nothing left to contribute apart from attaching yourself to my threads as even I don't want it.


Tempting though it is to imagine that that recent blank response was due to the respondent belatedly recalling the old adage that if one has nothing nice to say, better to say nothing, but more likely truth was that hungry for attention, their pet pussycat chose that particular moment to sit on their keyboard.
  #6  
Old October 19th 17, 01:45 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Martin Brown[_3_]
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Default Supernova structure

On 17/10/2017 07:56, Gerald Kelleher wrote:
https://www.scientificamerican.com/s...E81BC8B34C6357

Stellar evolution has a specific geometry to it whether as the
antecedent supernova star or after the event occurred -

https://apod.nasa.gov/apod/image/0701/sn1987a_hst.jpg


That much is true. To a very good approximation stars are spherical with
a small equatorial bulge determined by their rotation period. The
shorter their rotation period the more oblate they are.

Jupiter with an 8 hour period is obviously oblate whereas the sun with a
~23 day period is almost perfectly spherical.

When stars evolve to their giant phase the effective surface gravity at
their equator means that the outward solar wind is strongest in the
equatorial plane. Planetary nebulae like M57 and (misleadingly named
for how they looked a bit like planetary disks in early telescopes) are
examples of stars shedding their outer atmosphere in later life.

How they appear to us on Earth depends on the angle between our line of
sight and their spin axis. A zoo of famous ones online at:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_planetary_nebulae

--
Regards,
Martin Brown
  #7  
Old October 19th 17, 04:25 PM posted to sci.astro.amateur
Gerald Kelleher
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Posts: 889
Default Supernova structure

On Thursday, October 19, 2017 at 1:45:56 PM UTC+1, Martin Brown wrote:


When stars evolve to their giant phase the effective surface gravity at
their equator means that the outward solar wind is strongest in the
equatorial plane. Planetary nebulae like M57 and (misleadingly named
for how they looked a bit like planetary disks in early telescopes) are
examples of stars shedding their outer atmosphere in later life.


The geometry of two large external rings and a smaller intersecting ring surrounding a post-supernova star indicate that not only do stars survive but a solar system emerges from the spectacular transition. I would like to think there is enough spirit left in a person that they wouldn't shut out the possibility even aside from the fact that I worked on these rings long before they were observed in May 1994.
 




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