A Space & astronomy forum. SpaceBanter.com

If this is your first visit, be sure to check out the FAQ by clicking the link above. You may have to register before you can post: click the register link above to proceed. To start viewing messages, select the forum that you want to visit from the selection below.

Go Back   Home » SpaceBanter.com forum » Space Science » Policy
Site Map Home Authors List Search Today's Posts Mark Forums Read Web Partners

Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter



 
 
Thread Tools Display Modes
  #11  
Old December 3rd 17, 08:41 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Niels JÝrgen Kruse[_2_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 11
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...

"Jeff Findley" wrote in message
...

In article ,
says...

send a bunch of communication satellites and some inflatable habitats,
with supplies

Did you miss the beginning of this thread? Musk isn't taking
suggestions. He Tweeted he's sending his Tesla Roadster up on the first
Falcon Heavy flight. The first test flight has maybe a 50/50 chance of
success. So, this thing is going to be a mass simulator, albeit a fancy
one than your typical hunk of metal or tank of water.

Jeff


Does make me wonder, normally with a mass simulator you can at least decide
where your center of mass is, etc.
Curious if it's JUST the Tesla or other mass to make it ideal the way they
want.


A report today says it's NOT going to be his Tesla Roadster. Oh well,
it was fun while it lasted.

https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/1/1...n-heavy-tesla-
roadster-launch-elon-musk


Maybe they (theverge) ****ed him off.

http://www.syfy.com/syfywire/elon-musk-on-the-roadster-to-mars

--
Mvh./Regards, Niels JÝrgen Kruse, VanlÝse, Denmark
Ads
  #12  
Old December 3rd 17, 10:15 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...

In article ,
says...

send a bunch of communication satellites and some inflatable habitats, with supplies


Did you miss the beginning of this thread? Musk isn't taking
suggestions. He Tweeted he's sending his Tesla Roadster up on the first
Falcon Heavy flight. The first test flight has maybe a 50/50 chance of
success. So, this thing is going to be a mass simulator, albeit a fancy
one than your typical hunk of metal or tank of water.


And now for a complete reversal:

Elon Musk told us he was sending a car to space, then said he totally
made it up; 30 Other reports say that the plan is real
by Sean O'[email protected] Dec 1, 2017, 11:33pm EST
https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/1/1...n-heavy-tesla-
roadster-launch-elon-musk

From above:

Musk sent us a response in a direct message on Twitter saying
he "totally made it up."

The plot thickens. I'm as confused as everyone else right now.


At one point wasn't he joking about sending up several tons of
underwear, too?


--
"Taught me how to shoot to kill.
A specialist with a deadly skill.
A skill I needed to have to be a survivor.
It's over now, or so they say.
But sometimes it don't work out that way.
And you're never the same when you've been under fire."
-- Huey Lewis and the News "Walking On A Thin Line"
  #13  
Old December 4th 17, 11:12 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Jeff Findley[_6_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,483
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

In article ,
says...

Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...

In article ,
says...

send a bunch of communication satellites and some inflatable habitats, with supplies

Did you miss the beginning of this thread? Musk isn't taking
suggestions. He Tweeted he's sending his Tesla Roadster up on the first
Falcon Heavy flight. The first test flight has maybe a 50/50 chance of
success. So, this thing is going to be a mass simulator, albeit a fancy
one than your typical hunk of metal or tank of water.


And now for a complete reversal:

Elon Musk told us he was sending a car to space, then said he totally
made it up; 30 Other reports say that the plan is real
by Sean O'[email protected] Dec 1, 2017, 11:33pm EST
https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/1/1...n-heavy-tesla-
roadster-launch-elon-musk

From above:

Musk sent us a response in a direct message on Twitter saying
he "totally made it up."

The plot thickens. I'm as confused as everyone else right now.


At one point wasn't he joking about sending up several tons of
underwear, too?


I didn't hear that one. Just what kind of sites are you visiting? :-)

Jeff
--
All opinions posted by me on Usenet News are mine, and mine alone.
These posts do not reflect the opinions of my family, friends,
employer, or any organization that I am a member of.
  #15  
Old December 4th 17, 04:23 PM posted to sci.space.policy
Fred J. McCall[_3_]
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 9,485
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...

Jeff Findley wrote:

In article ,
says...

In article ,
says...

send a bunch of communication satellites and some inflatable habitats, with supplies

Did you miss the beginning of this thread? Musk isn't taking
suggestions. He Tweeted he's sending his Tesla Roadster up on the first
Falcon Heavy flight. The first test flight has maybe a 50/50 chance of
success. So, this thing is going to be a mass simulator, albeit a fancy
one than your typical hunk of metal or tank of water.

And now for a complete reversal:

Elon Musk told us he was sending a car to space, then said he totally
made it up; 30 Other reports say that the plan is real
by Sean O'[email protected] Dec 1, 2017, 11:33pm EST
https://www.theverge.com/2017/12/1/1...n-heavy-tesla-
roadster-launch-elon-musk

From above:

Musk sent us a response in a direct message on Twitter saying
he "totally made it up."

The plot thickens. I'm as confused as everyone else right now.


At one point wasn't he joking about sending up several tons of
underwear, too?


I didn't hear that one. Just what kind of sites are you visiting? :-)


I think he originally said it when he talked about funding BFR by
selling underwear. Watch his Australia presentation on the new BFR
configuration. I think he even mentioned it in passing there, when he
talked about now having a real idea about how to fund it.

Wouldn't you want to buy a Falcon Heavy or BFR tee that had actually
been launched on Falcon Heavy or BFR?


--
"The reasonable man adapts himself to the world; the unreasonable
man persists in trying to adapt the world to himself. Therefore,
all progress depends on the unreasonable man."
--George Bernard Shaw
  #16  
Old December 12th 17, 08:12 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Sylvia Else
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,056
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

On 3/12/2017 1:38 AM, Jeff Findley wrote:

Falcon Heavy has maybe a 50/50 chance of success on its first flight.
But you can't launch it empty, because that doesn't properly simulate a
flight with a payload on top. So, you really do need a mass simulator.
In the past, mass simulators have been solid chunks of metal or a tank
filled with something benign like water.

Well, Elon Musk isn't one to follow the old boring trends. So, he
announced his payload plan (mass simulator) to the public via Twitter
last night:

On Friday evening, Musk tweeted what that payload would be his
"midnight cherry Tesla Roadster." And the car will be playing
Space Oddity, by David Bowie; the song which begins, "Ground
Control to Major Tom."


In fairness to any aliens who come across it hundreds of millions of
years hence, there should be an attempt[*] made to explain how what is
clearly a land vehicle designed for a gravity field much larger than
that of Mars should end up in orbit around it.

Sylvia.
[*] Which pretty much implies providing a complete language course
designed for aliens.
  #17  
Old December 12th 17, 03:47 PM posted to sci.space.policy
David Spain
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,466
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

On 12/12/2017 3:12 AM, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 3/12/2017 1:38 AM, Jeff Findley wrote:

Falcon Heavy has maybe a 50/50 chance of success on its first flight.
But you can't launch it empty, because that doesn't properly simulate a
flight with a payload on top.¬* So, you really do need a mass simulator.
In the past, mass simulators have been solid chunks of metal or a tank
filled with something benign like water.

Well, Elon Musk isn't one to follow the old boring trends.¬* So, he
announced his payload plan (mass simulator) to the public via Twitter
last night:

¬*¬*¬* On Friday evening, Musk tweeted what that payload would be his
¬*¬*¬* "midnight cherry Tesla Roadster." And the car will be playing
¬*¬*¬* Space Oddity, by David Bowie; the song which begins, "Ground
¬*¬*¬* Control to Major Tom."


In fairness to any aliens who come across it hundreds of millions of
years hence, there should be an attempt[*] made to explain how what is
clearly a land vehicle designed for a gravity field much larger than
that of Mars should end up in orbit around it.

Sylvia.

[*] Which pretty much implies providing a complete language course
designed for aliens.


Although fun to imagine, this story has been de-bunked, by Musk himself.
It was Elon winking at us....

However orbiting a CD of Bowie songs, including Space Oddity, ought not
to be out of the question. And would keep the aliens busy for a long
time....


Dave

  #18  
Old December 17th 17, 01:17 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Sylvia Else
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,056
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

On 13/12/2017 2:47 AM, David Spain wrote:
On 12/12/2017 3:12 AM, Sylvia Else wrote:
On 3/12/2017 1:38 AM, Jeff Findley wrote:

Falcon Heavy has maybe a 50/50 chance of success on its first flight.
But you can't launch it empty, because that doesn't properly simulate a
flight with a payload on top. So, you really do need a mass simulator.
In the past, mass simulators have been solid chunks of metal or a tank
filled with something benign like water.

Well, Elon Musk isn't one to follow the old boring trends. So, he
announced his payload plan (mass simulator) to the public via Twitter
last night:

On Friday evening, Musk tweeted what that payload would be his
"midnight cherry Tesla Roadster." And the car will be playing
Space Oddity, by David Bowie; the song which begins, "Ground
Control to Major Tom."


In fairness to any aliens who come across it hundreds of millions of
years hence, there should be an attempt[*] made to explain how what is
clearly a land vehicle designed for a gravity field much larger than
that of Mars should end up in orbit around it.

Sylvia.

[*] Which pretty much implies providing a complete language course
designed for aliens.


Although fun to imagine, this story has been de-bunked, by Musk himself.
It was Elon winking at us....

However orbiting a CD of Bowie songs, including Space Oddity, ought not
to be out of the question. And would keep the aliens busy for a long
time....


Dave


Do CDs, even pressed CDs, work after hundreds of millions of years?

Sylvia.
  #19  
Old December 17th 17, 01:41 AM posted to sci.space.policy
David Spain
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 2,466
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

On 12/16/2017 8:17 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:

Do CDs, even pressed CDs, work after hundreds of millions of years?

Sylvia.


Well if you're going to go all out post-historic on me, probably not.

Interesting digression....

Space vacuum with protection from radiation helps a great deal, the real
issue is probably temperature regulation to prevent de-bonding. That's
probably a CD killer.

Here's a list of issues:

quote
How Do CDs or DVDs Rot?

As mentioned above, different types of optical discs contain different
layers and particularly the reflective layer is susceptible to damage.
Standard compact discs typically have a reflective layer made from
aluminum. When exposed to air, aluminum oxidizes, which naturally
happens around the edges of the CD. However, degradation of the
reflective layer is not the only cause of disc rot.

The causes of disc rot are manifold and can include one of the following:

oxidation or corrosion of reflective layer
physical damage to disc surfaces or edges
galvanic reaction between layers and coatings
chemical reactions with contaminants
ultra-violet light damage
breaking down of disc materials, e.g. de-bonding of adhesives
between layers

Interestingly, while most types of disc rot are caused by inappropriate
use and/or storage, there is one in particular, i.e. CD bronzing, which
is caused by a fault in manufacturing.
/quote

From:
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/cds-tru...vity-mold-rot/

Being in vacuum takes care of item 1. Not being in the possession of
humans takes care of item 2. Item 3 is a limiting factor, being in space
won't change this. Item 4 highly unlikely if the capsule was prepped in
a "clean room", unless the disk was ill-manufactured. Item 5 is an issue
but gamma rays are probably far worse than UV in a space environment, so
assume disk would need rad shielding and would have it in a capsule.
Item 6 is probably the most significant problem, esp. if the disc is
exposed to extreme cold.

Dave
  #20  
Old December 17th 17, 04:30 AM posted to sci.space.policy
Sylvia Else
external usenet poster
 
Posts: 1,056
Default Falcon Heavy test flight payload announced on Twitter

On 17/12/2017 12:41 PM, David Spain wrote:
On 12/16/2017 8:17 PM, Sylvia Else wrote:

Do CDs, even pressed CDs, work after hundreds of millions of years?

Sylvia.


Well if you're going to go all out post-historic on me, probably not.

Interesting digression....

Space vacuum with protection from radiation helps a great deal, the real
issue is probably temperature regulation to prevent de-bonding. That's
probably a CD killer.

Here's a list of issues:

quote
How Do CDs or DVDs Rot?

As mentioned above, different types of optical discs contain different
layers and particularly the reflective layer is susceptible to damage.
Standard compact discs typically have a reflective layer made from
aluminum. When exposed to air, aluminum oxidizes, which naturally
happens around the edges of the CD. However, degradation of the
reflective layer is not the only cause of disc rot.

The causes of disc rot are manifold and can include one of the following:

oxidation or corrosion of reflective layer
physical damage to disc surfaces or edges
galvanic reaction between layers and coatings
chemical reactions with contaminants
ultra-violet light damage
breaking down of disc materials, e.g. de-bonding of adhesives
between layers

Interestingly, while most types of disc rot are caused by inappropriate
use and/or storage, there is one in particular, i.e. CD bronzing, which
is caused by a fault in manufacturing.
/quote

From:
http://www.makeuseof.com/tag/cds-tru...vity-mold-rot/

Being in vacuum takes care of item 1. Not being in the possession of
humans takes care of item 2. Item 3 is a limiting factor, being in space
won't change this. Item 4 highly unlikely if the capsule was prepped in
a "clean room", unless the disk was ill-manufactured. Item 5 is an issue
but gamma rays are probably far worse than UV in a space environment, so
assume disk would need rad shielding and would have it in a capsule.
Item 6 is probably the most significant problem, esp. if the disc is
exposed to extreme cold.

Dave


I suspect that on the time scale of hundreds of millions of years,
effects like evaporation become significant.

Sylvia.
 




Thread Tools
Display Modes

Posting Rules
You may not post new threads
You may not post replies
You may not post attachments
You may not edit your posts

vB code is On
Smilies are On
[IMG] code is On
HTML code is Off
Forum Jump

Similar Threads
Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
SpaceX Falcon Heavy Flight Animation Jeff Findley[_6_] Policy 21 February 15th 15 03:07 PM
Could Delta IV Heavy use the same technique as Falcon Heavy Alan Erskine[_3_] Space Shuttle 1 May 20th 11 07:56 AM
The long-awaited Delta-4-Heavy test flight has just taken off -- WOW Jim Oberg Space Station 8 December 23rd 04 08:17 PM
Boeing Delta IV Heavy Achieves Major Test Objectives in First Flight Jacques van Oene News 0 December 22nd 04 07:25 PM
The long-awaited Delta-4-Heavy test flight has just taken off -- WOW Jim Oberg Policy 4 December 22nd 04 04:11 PM


All times are GMT +1. The time now is 11:00 AM.


Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.6.4
Copyright ©2000 - 2018, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Copyright ©2004-2018 SpaceBanter.com.
The comments are property of their posters.