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-   -   Hologram Telescope (http://www.spacebanter.com/showthread.php?t=55767)

phoenix April 25th 05 11:14 AM

Hologram Telescope
 

Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.

In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??

phoenix


RichA April 25th 05 02:27 PM

On 25 Apr 2005 03:14:12 -0700, "phoenix" wrote:


Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.

In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??

phoenix


No. I don't care what they could do on the Enterprise holodeck, it
was all nonsense. But, maybe a ring of controllable and tiny black
holes around the periphery of the objective opening could be used to
"bend light" to achieve the results you're looking for. Kind of like
how an electron microscope uses magnets instead of lenses to
manipulate electrons.
-Rich

William McHale April 25th 05 02:45 PM

phoenix wrote:

Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.


In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??


You have been watching too much Star Trek :). Theoretically I see no way
a "holographic" telescope could work. Light can't impact the path of light.

There are ways that theoretically one could bend light without a physical
lens; but they would involve manipulating the fabric of space time :).

--
Bill

phoenix April 25th 05 03:00 PM


William McHale wrote:
phoenix wrote:

Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.


In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??


You have been watching too much Star Trek :). Theoretically I see no

way
a "holographic" telescope could work. Light can't impact the path of

light.

Hmm.. that's right... refraction of light depends on the difference
between the speed of light of the mediums and the continued
absorptions and emissions of the electrons from the photons.


There are ways that theoretically one could bend light without a

physical
lens; but they would involve manipulating the fabric of space time

:).

Strong mass can bend light. Maybe putting heavy neutron star matter
at the periphery of the tube?? But then it's no longer lightweight
unless 4000 A.D. technology has developed antigravity so you can
take it along with you as well as higgs field suppressor to prevent
the heavy neutron star mass from being formed while being carried.

If not possible. Maybe they will have their own version of AP Traveller
with unbreakable unscratcheable glass with 0 wavefront error correction
:)
I heard that science can extend life indefinitely within 30 years with
advances in genetic and nanotechnology. Would Roland Christen with his
billions be recipient of this immortal technological upgrade to the
human body? :)

Ph



--
Bill



Davoud April 25th 05 03:08 PM

phoenix:
...Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front...


William McHale:
You have been watching too much Star Trek :). Theoretically I see no way
a "holographic" telescope could work. Light can't impact the path of light.


There are ways that theoretically one could bend light without a physical
lens; but they would involve manipulating the fabric of space time :).


A gravitational-lens telescope?

"An entire amateur astronomy club disappeared from the known universe
as one of its members brought a gravitational-lens telescope to a star
party and club members who gathered around to have a look were sucked
into the black hole that comprised the telescope's 'lens.' An onlooker
who was sufficiently distant from the telescope to avoid the
instrument's event horizon reported that she heard a chorus of voices
shout 'Wow, what a view!' before the group 'simply disappeared.' The
Department of Homeland Security is investigating whether the group had
ties to Al-Qa'eda. Congressional Republicans are calling for a ban on
amateur astronomy, but the effort is not expected to go anywhere, as an
NRA spokesman says that the group opposes regulation of anything that
could be mistaken for a rocket launcher."

Davoud

--
usenet *at* davidillig dawt com

shneor April 25th 05 03:15 PM

LOL!

Shneor


Chris L Peterson April 25th 05 03:58 PM

On 25 Apr 2005 03:14:12 -0700, "phoenix" wrote:


Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.

In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??


If you mean some sort of projected lens, no, that doesn't seem possible
(at the least, it would depend on technology and physics not yet
envisioned).

But certainly, holographic lenses are already used in a variety of
optics, including devices with optical properties that can be changed
electronically. Many laser pointers use holographic lenses, and
holographic mirrors create the moving beam pattern in supermarket
checkout scanners. At the chip scale, holographic optics are used to
focus and steer light in complex ways.

The only things standing in the way of a complete holographic telescope
are engineering issues (not physics issues). But such a telescope would
probably not offer many advantages over a conventional design, and might
have certain serious optical problems, so I don't see anyone rushing to
invest heavily in this type of instrument.

_________________________________________________

Chris L Peterson
Cloudbait Observatory
http://www.cloudbait.com

[email protected] April 25th 05 04:02 PM

You must be psychic! I suggested this idea a while ago.
I imagined a laser producing a large reflecting spherical surface in a
cloud of reflective particles to act as a telescope primary.
The responses were't very positive last time round either. grin

Chris.B


[email protected] April 25th 05 04:52 PM

Yes, such a holographic lens is possible but it has extreme
limitations, notable it would work only at the wavelength at which the
original hologram was made. I also suspect it would have odd
aberations (other than chromatic). Such a lens would be diffractive
rather than refractive which is what may be confusing some people about
this possibility.
Theoretically, a Fresnel zone plate could be substituted for a lens but
such would be difficult to fabricate.

DBO

wrote:
You must be psychic! I suggested this idea a while ago.
I imagined a laser producing a large reflecting spherical surface in

a
cloud of reflective particles to act as a telescope primary.
The responses were't very positive last time round either. grin

Chris.B



William McHale April 25th 05 05:40 PM

RichA wrote:
On 25 Apr 2005 03:14:12 -0700, "phoenix" wrote:



Theoretically. Is it possible to construct a telescope using
holographic lens such that you flick a switch and the lens
just formed at the front. I like the idea of a very lightweight
0 wave error 6" refractor that I can carry at my back when
hiking and just putting it on the equally lightweight image
stabilizer mount when the sky has a great view.

In 4000 A.D. Can the above occur.. theoretically??

phoenix


No. I don't care what they could do on the Enterprise holodeck, it
was all nonsense. But, maybe a ring of controllable and tiny black
holes around the periphery of the objective opening could be used to
"bend light" to achieve the results you're looking for. Kind of like
how an electron microscope uses magnets instead of lenses to
manipulate electrons.


You could also put a single slightly larger black hole in the center of the
objective opening. Of course this would not make refractor people happy since
you would now have an obstructed system.

One advantage though would be that you would not have to worry about people
touching the lens... well actually you would because the amount of radiation
released as they were ripped apart by tidal effects and sucked into the lens
certainly would not be that healthy for anyone in the vicinity :).

--
Bill



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