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Richard Crisp
January 9th 04, 03:23 AM
I put my recent emission line M1 image next to an RGB image of M1 I found on
the net.

It is interesting to me to see how the emission line filters basically
"block" the broadband synchrotron radiation from the core, effectively
punching through the fog. On the other hand they really attenuate the stars.

Here is that image:

http://www.rdcrisp.darkhorizons.org/images/m1_emission_vs_rgb.jpg


the one on the left is the emission line image made using [SII], Ha and
[OIII]. The one on the right is a standard RGB image.

Richard Crisp

Richard Crisp
January 9th 04, 04:47 AM
I put a better M1 for comparision on my webpage.

Have a look:

http://www.rdcrisp.darkhorizons.org/m1_crab_nebula_S2HaO3_page.htm

Best wishes!
rdc


"Richard Crisp" > wrote in message
...
> I put my recent emission line M1 image next to an RGB image of M1 I found
on
> the net.
>
> It is interesting to me to see how the emission line filters basically
> "block" the broadband synchrotron radiation from the core, effectively
> punching through the fog. On the other hand they really attenuate the
stars.
>
> Here is that image:
>
> http://www.rdcrisp.darkhorizons.org/images/m1_emission_vs_rgb.jpg
>
>
> the one on the left is the emission line image made using [SII], Ha and
> [OIII]. The one on the right is a standard RGB image.
>
> Richard Crisp
>
>

George Normandin
January 10th 04, 10:13 PM
"Richard Crisp" <> wrote

> I put my recent emission line M1 image next to an RGB image of M1 I found
on
> the net.
>
> It is interesting to me to see how the emission line filters basically
> "block" the broadband synchrotron radiation from the core, effectively
> punching through the fog. On the other hand they really attenuate the
stars.

Interesting stuff Richard!

If you did a broad-band blue or green image, I suppose that it would do
just the opposite, i.e., it would only show the synchrotron radiation that
is unique to SN remnants like M-1. I've also seen folks attempt using IR
filters to cut out the nebulosity in star forming regions in order to 'find'
the star cluster within.

When SBIG first offered narrow-band filters, they also had wider filters
that were near in color. I understood that they were for subtracting out
stuff like dust reflections to bring out the emission line radiation even
more. I've not looked to see if these filters are still offered.

BTW, folks better get use to unusual color images, because the Webb Space
Telescope that will replace Hubble will work in the IR, not the visual range
like HST.

George Normandin