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Jonathan Silverlight
July 29th 03, 11:15 PM
In message >, Ron Baalke
> writes
>http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/982.html
>
>World's largest astronomical CCD camera installed on Palomar
>Observatory telescope
>Indiana University
>July 29, 2003

>
>In addition to the usual point-and-shoot mode, the new camera is
>designed to work in the
>drift scan mode. The telescope is pointed at the sky but does not move
>to counteract the
>rotation of the Earth. Instead, various objects in the sky gradually
>drift across the field of
>view at the same rate as the computer records data from the CCDs, producing
>photographs that are long strips of the sky. Astronomers will use these
>photographic slices
>of the sky to look for quasars, supernovae, asteroids and more.

This must be the ultimate version of the technique Tom Droege was
working on a few years ago.
--
"Roads in space for rockets to travel....four-dimensional roads, curving with
relativity"
Mail to jsilverlight AT merseia.fsnet.co.uk is welcome.
Or visit Jonathan's Space Site http://www.merseia.fsnet.co.uk

O'Brother
July 30th 03, 02:22 AM
"Jonathan Silverlight" > wrote in message
...
> In message >, Ron Baalke
> > writes
> >http://newsinfo.iu.edu/news/page/normal/982.html
> >
> >World's largest astronomical CCD camera installed on Palomar
> >Observatory telescope
> >Indiana University
> >July 29, 2003
>
> >
> >In addition to the usual point-and-shoot mode, the new camera is
> >designed to work in the
> >drift scan mode. The telescope is pointed at the sky but does not move
> >to counteract the
> >rotation of the Earth. Instead, various objects in the sky gradually
> >drift across the field of
> >view at the same rate as the computer records data from the CCDs,
producing
> >photographs that are long strips of the sky. Astronomers will use these
> >photographic slices
> >of the sky to look for quasars, supernovae, asteroids and more.
>
> This must be the ultimate version of the technique Tom Droege was
> working on a few years ago.

He still is: http://www.tass-survey.org

Interesting reading and much more.

> --
> "Roads in space for rockets to travel....four-dimensional roads, curving
with
> relativity"
> Mail to jsilverlight AT merseia.fsnet.co.uk is welcome.
> Or visit Jonathan's Space Site http://www.merseia.fsnet.co.uk

Odysseus
July 31st 03, 07:53 AM
Steve Willner wrote:
>
> In article >,
> Jonathan Silverlight > writes:
> > This must be the ultimate version of the technique Tom Droege was
> > working on a few years ago.
>
> I am not so sure about "ultimate," although that is not to denigrate
> the project in any way. I'm sure it will do great things. The
> technique, "TDI," is far from new, but that does not make it any less
> valuable.
>
> People interested in this sort of thing might want to see
> http://www.noao.edu/lsst/
>
> The plan is to have over 2 gigapixels. I don't think even this is
> necessarily "ultimate."
>
"Ultimate" means "last", but not necessarily "the last ever".

--
Odysseus